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These Daytonians are going to be immortalized in our city’s own Walk of Fame

A three-time Oscar nominee, a husband and wife crime fighting team, and the woman who gave Marvel’s “Black Panther” its eye-popping look are among the next class to be immortalized in the Dayton Region’s Walk of Fame.

>> Wright State grad plays pivotal role in much-anticipated Marvel movie 

The inductees will be celebrated at a luncheon on Thursday, Sept. 27 at the Sinclair College Conference Center, 444 W Third St. in Dayton. 

Tickets for the luncheon are available on the Dayton Walk of Fame website.

Individual tickets are $70. 

Inductees will be on hand during the Walk the Walk street party 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m in the Wright Dunbar Historic Business District May 18. 

The street party ends at 9 p.m. 

The Dayton Region’s Walk of Fame’s memorial stones are on West Third Street in the  business district between Broadway and Shannon streets and along William Street.  

>> RELATED: Daytonians who’ve made us proud

The 2018 honorees are: Hannah Beachler, Major General George R. CrookDr. Richard A. DeWallRobert C. Koepnick, Dayton police sgt. Lucius J. Rice and police officer Dora Burton Rice, and Julia Reichert

Below are their bios from the Dayton Region Walk of Fame. 

HANNAH BEACHLER (1971- )

Groundbreaking media production designer 

Hannah Beachler grew up in Centerville, Ohio, majored in fashion design as an undergraduate at the University of Cincinnati and then went back to school at Wright State University in 2005 to earn a B.F.A. from WSU’s Motion Pictures Program. She began working on films as a set dresser in small movies and horror films. Her talent and attention to detail quickly brought her assignments as a production designer. She won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Film for Fruitvale Station and the Audience Award for the Best Film at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013. In 2017 she was nominated for an Emmy and won the Art Directors Guild Award for Excellence in Production Design for a video for Beyoncé. Her most recent success came as the first-ever female black production designer for a Marvel film. That film, Black Panther, is breaking box office records and is one of the most talked about films of the season. She returns home to spend time at WSU talking to students about her career and mentoring many young filmmakers. 

 >> Emmy-award winner: ‘I am proud and grateful beyond words to be from Dayton’

MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE R. CROOK (1828-1890)

Leader in the U.S. military and civil rights activist 

George R. Crook was born and raised near Taylorsville, now a part of Huber Heights, Ohio. He graduated from West Point in 1892. He is recognized as a major figure in U.S. military and civil rights history. He had an active career in the Civil War capped by his Division causing General Robert E. Lee to surrender at Appomattox. He was an important commander in the Indian Wars that followed the Civil War. While serving as the Commander of the Department of the Platte in 1879, Crook arranged to have himself sued on behalf of the Ponca tribe. The case resulted in a major civil rights victory when Chief Standing Bear was recognized as a person under the law and therefore Native Americans were entitled to equal protection under U.S. law. Sioux Chief Red Cloud remarked after Crook’s passing that, “He, at least, never lied to us. His works gave us hope.” 

>> This local McDonald’s is getting a huge makeover -- and table service

DR. RICHARD A. DEWALL (1926-2016) 

Pioneer heart surgeon 

Dr. Richard DeWall came to Dayton in 1966 and spent 50 years of his life here. He is credited with inventing the first workable, portable heart-lung machine. Dr. Doug Talbott recruited him to Dayton, and Mrs. Virginia Kettering invited him to initiate an open-heart surgery program at Kettering Hospital, where he performed the first successful open-heart surgery in the area. He established the general surgery residency-training program, serving as its director from 1970-1976 and also acted as a consultant to the National Institutes of Health. The winner of many national and local awards, his proudest accomplishment was his role in the founding of Wright State University School of Medicine because he wrote the original proposal for what would become the medical school. He also helped establish the Wright State School of Medicine Foundation. He said, “With the bubble oxygenator (the name of his invention), you are dealing with maybe several hundred patients a year. With a medical school, when you get it expanded, you’re dealing with thousands.” 

>> This new sandwich shop opens TODAY

ROBERT C. KOEPNICK (1907-1997)

Nationally known sculptor, talented teacher 

Robert C. Koepnick, a native Daytonian, was born in 1907 and lived virtually all of his life in the Dayton Region. He was a sculptor of national reputation and maintained a studio in Lebanon, Ohio until shortly before his death. He was a prolific, versatile sculptor who worked in wood, bronze, stone, aluminum, and terra cotta. He studied with Carl Miles, the noted Swedish sculptor. He headed the sculpture department at the Dayton Art Institute for almost 30 years, with the exception of a five-year period during World War II when he worked for the Aeromedical Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, helping to design gloves and oxygen masks that made it possible for pilots to fly at ever increasing altitudes. His works are displayed in many states, and he has exhibited in distinguished museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the National Academy of Design, and the Dayton Art Institute. At least 17 of his major works are displayed in Dayton. He once remarked that, to his amazement, “I really marked up this world.” 

>> HAVE YOU BEEN? This tavern just north of Dayton is a throwback favorite

POLICE SERGEANT LUCIUS J. RICE AND POLICEWOMAN DORA BURTON RICE (1876-1939; 1882-1940)

 Long serving pioneer Police officer and community activist policewoman 

In 1896, when he was 20, Sgt. Lucius Rice moved from North Carolina to Dayton where he met his future wife Dora, a first cousin of the renowned poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar. He served in the Ohio National Guard, distinguishing himself at Lake Erie in 1908 and winning government marksmanship medals. After being honorably discharged from the military, he was appointed to the Dayton Police Department. He became the second African-American man to serve on the Dayton police force and was one of the longest serving Dayton Police officers of the 20th century, serving more than 30 years. He was the first African-American lawman to be appointed a plainclothes detective. He was the first African-American in Dayton to become a police supervisor when he was promoted to sergeant in 1916. During his career, he served with distinction and sacrifice, often working 12-hour days, wounded twice, and then tragically lost his life in the line of duty in 1939. 

>>  RELATED: In the face of humiliation, this Dayton native smashed police barriers -- and was just honored at this ceremony

Dora Rice first played the role of homemaker until her children were older when she became a community activist in her church, serving Wesleyan Methodist Church as treasurer for 20 years and as church organist for over 22 years. Then she chose to join her husband in law enforcement. In 1929 she was appointed to the Dayton Bureau of Policewomen, becoming the first African-American policewoman in Dayton. She served for 10 years before resigning for poor health and died six months after her husband was killed. Sgt. Rice is remembered by the Dayton Police History Foundation as a local legend and his wife as a civic activist and Dayton Police Woman. 

JULIA REICHERT (1946- )

Pioneering independent filmmaker and educator 

Julia Reichert, a graduate of Antioch, has been called the godmother of the American independent film movement. She is a three-time Oscar nominee. Her film Growing up Female was the first feature document of the modern Women’s Movement. Recently it was chosen for inclusion in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. One of her films (with Steven Bognar) premiered at Sundance and won the Primetime Emmy for Exceptional Merit in Nonfiction Filming. She writes, directs, and produces. She is a voting member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences and of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a member of the advisory board of the Independent Feature Project. She is the co-founder of the New Day Films, a 42-year old social issue film distribution co-op, author of Doing it Yourself, the first book on self-distribution in independent film, a professor of motion pictures at Wright State University and a grandmother. 

 >> Why this local filmmaker win won a  $50,000 grant (January 20, 2016) 

Dangerous content lurking on musical app popular with kids

A cheery, popular music app geared toward children and teens appears to have a dark side, KTVB reported.

>> Read more trending news

Parents are being warned to pay attention to the app Musical.ly, which has more than 200 million users. The app, which can be used on cellphones, is designed to create and share videos of lip-syncing, which seems harmless enough. However, if certain words are typed into the app, disturbing and inappropriate videos could appear, KTVB reported.

Reports of videos that showed children stripping and flashing the camera have surfaced, along with other users “liking” the actions to egg on the participants. Code words are constantly changing in order to skirt the app’s moderators, KTVB reported.

Videos featuring anorexia, suicide and self-harm also have surfaced when certain words are typed into the app, KTVB reported.

David Gomez, a school resource officer in Meridian, Idaho, who teaches an internet safety class, said it's vitally important that parents not only know what their kids are doing online, but to also tell their kids they are watching.

"As a parent, if you show your kid that you are checking on them and that you do care and that you're going to be watching out for their best interest, a lot of times that will help shape their decisions when you're not around," Gomez told KTVB.

Parents can use parental controls to block the Musical.ly app altogether, the station reported.

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YouTube Launches Cable-Free Live Streaming TV Service

YouTube Launches Cable-Free Live Streaming TV Service

Jobless and nearly homeless, Rachel Dolezal still isn't sorry for posing as black

It’s been two years since it was revealed that former NAACP branch leader Rachel Dolezal is actually white. Not only is she on the brink of homelessness, having been unable to find a job, but she’s still maintaining that she did nothing wrong by posing as an African-American woman.

“I’m not going to stoop and apologize and grovel and feel bad about it,” she told the Guardian. “I would just be going back to when I was little and had to be what everybody else told me I should be — to make them happy.”

>> Rachel Dolezal announces memoir 'In Full Color: Finding My Place in a Black and White World'

Dolezal stepped down from her position in 2015 when her parents revealed that she was not actually African-American. While she eventually admitted to being “biologically born white to white parents,” she argued that she identifies as African-American, saying that race is “not coded in your DNA.”

She claims to have applied for more than one hundred jobs, but that no one will hire her, aside from those within the reality television and pornography industries. Even her memoir, “In Full Color,” which is due to be released in March, was turned down by over 30 publishers before one picked up the book. She currently relies on food stamps and help from friends in order to get by. She told the Guardian that she will probably be homeless next month.

“Right now, the only place I feel understood and completely accepted is with my kids and my sister,” she said. “The narrative was that I’d offended both communities in an unforgivable way, so anybody who gave me a dime would be contributing to wrong and oppression and bad things – to a liar and fraud and a con.”

Dolezal says her memoir is her way of telling her side of the story and opening up a dialogue about race and identity.

>> Read more trending news

“The times I tried to explain more, I wasn’t understood more. Nobody wanted to hear, ‘I’m pan-African, pro-black, bisexual, an artist, mother and educator,’” she told the Guardian. “People would just be like, ‘Huh? What? What are you talking about?'”

But would she ever consider simply telling people that she’s white?

“No. This is still home to me,” Dolezal said. “I didn’t feel like I’m ever going to be hurt so much that I somehow leave who I am, because I’m me. It really is who I am. It’s not a choice.”

Read the full story at the Guardian.

Amazon Lowers Minimum Amount For Free Shipping

Amazon Lowers Minimum Amount For Free Shipping

Photos: Trump vs. Clinton in final debate

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