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Divorce attorney killed by client's husband in murder-suicide, officials say

A prominent divorce attorney in Georgia was shot and killed at his law office Wednesday by the husband of a client he was representing, Bartow County officials confirmed. 

>> Wife shoots, kills woman after finding her with husband, sources say

Details on what led to the fatal shooting of Antonio B. Mari at his law offices were not released

Authorities were called to the 600 block of North Tennessee Street, where the law office is located, about 1:30 p.m., Cartersville police Lt. Mike Bettikofer told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Authorities found the suspect, Walter Samuel Radford, 33, of Cartersville, dead at his wife’s home on Willow Bend Drive, Bartow County coroner Joel Guyton told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Radford’s wife, Cindy, was not at the law offices at the time of the shooting. 

>> Read more trending news 

According to media reports, Mari was representing Cindy Radford in her divorce. 

Mari, 41, of Acworth, graduated from the University of Georgia and taught social studies for 10 years in Bartow County. 

After graduating law school, Mari opened a firm in Cartersville and opened a location in Cobb County in 2012.

Summer solstice 2018: What is the summer solstice and why is today the 'longest' one of the year?

If you are looking to soak up some sun, today would be the day to do it. 

Thursday marks the summer solstice, and for those in the Northern hemisphere, you will see more daylight than on any other day of the year. 

>>Read more trending news 

What is the summer solstice and what does that have to do with the longest day of the year? Here’s a quick look at what it means.

What is it?

The solstice happens when the sun reaches the highest point in the sky relative to the equator, meaning the Northern Hemisphere is tilted fully toward the sun. In fact, the North Pole is tilted far enough toward the sun to where the Arctic Circle will see 24 hours of daylight.

The sun reaches its northernmost point on Earth during the summer solstice. Do you know where that is? 

The sun will reach its northernmost point when it hits 23 degrees 27 minutes north latitude – in the Tropic of Cancer.

When does it do that?

In 2018, the solstice falls on Thursday at 6:07 a.m. EDT.

Wait, isn’t it on the same day every year?

The summer solstice happens each year between June 20-22. 

Why isn’t it on the same day every year? 

Blame it on math. The fact that the date floats is due, in part, to the difference between the Gregorian calendar system, which normally has 365 days, and the tropical year (how long it takes Earth to orbit the Sun one time), which is about 365.242199 days, according to The Farmer’s Almanac. 

The Georgian calendar adds a leap day every four years to make up for the extra .242199. The leap day, along with other factors, moves the summer solstice backward and forward on the calendar by a couple of days.

Why is it the longest day of the year?

It’s known as the longest day of the year not because it’s any longer than any other day, but because in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s the day that receives the most hours of daylight. It receives the most sunlight because the Earth is tilted toward the sun for the longest time during a day.

If it is the longest day of the year and it’s summertime, why isn’t it the hottest day of the year?

It’s not the hottest day of the year because the Earth releases the energy it absorbs at various rates – but it never releases it instantly. On Thursday, the Earth will receive the most energy from the sun, but will release that energy in late July or August, usually. This effect, according to Weather Works, is called seasonal temperature lag. 

Koko the gorilla who could sign, owned kitten, dies 

Koko the gorilla, the simian who showed the world that they could communicate has died. 

The Gorilla Foundation made the announcement

Koko was born 46 years ago at the San Francisco Zoo. She was taught sign language by Dr. Francine Patterson starting in 1974, The Associated Press reported.

She had a vocabulary of about 1,000 words of American Sign Language, National Geographic reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Koko’s ability to communicate and the empathy she showed made the gorilla a national treasure. She was featured on National Geographic’s cover twice, including one from 1978 that featured a photo that the animal took of herself in a mirror.

She had learned how to use a camera after watching a photographer and imitating him. At the end of the National Geographic photoshoot, she signed “love camera,” according to National Geographic.

The second cover, from 1985, showed the large western lowland gorilla cradling a kitten. Koko had asked for a kitten for Christmas in 1984. Her caretakers gave her a stuffed animal, but that didn’t work for the gorilla who told her human family that she was sad that she didn’t get a real cat, The Los Angeles Times reported in 1985. So on her birthday, she was allowed to chose one and became famous being a gorilla who had a kitten as a pet. Researchers said that Koko would cradle and pet the small cat, while the feline would treat Koko like a human. Like any cat, she was independent, and would bite, or get loose when she had had enough love from her gorilla caretaker. When that happened, Koko would sign “obnoxious cat.” But when the kitten, whom Koko named All Ball, wanted affection, Koko would sign,“soft, good cat.”  Koko and All Ball’s family came to an end, though, when the cat wandered into a road and was hit by a car. Koko signed about death after the kitten was killed and cried, mourning her pet, the Times reported.

That wasn’t the only time that Koko showed that she understood death and would mourn the passing of a friend, the “Today” show reported. When she was told of Robin Williams’s death in 2014, she became sad, Patterson wrote on Koko.org. Williams and Koko became friends after they met in 2001.

The Gorilla Foundation said it will keep Koko’s memory alive by continuing its conservation efforts in Africa, operating a great ape sanctuary on Maui and developing a sign language app that features Koko that will help gorillas and children learning to sign.

Koko died in her sleep at the age of 46, the AP reported.

Break-in suspect with huge face tattoo arrested after Facebook post goes viral

An Ohio break-in suspect who goes by “Popeye” and sports a large, unusual face tattoo may be as recognizable as the sailor man himself.

According to WKRC, Anthony Ward was arrested on theft and breaking-and-entering charges Wednesday after the Adams County Sheriff's Office shared his photo on Facebook.

>> Man arrested after trying to pay waitress with her own stolen credit card, police say

“Be on the look out for aka (Popeye) Anthony Ward,” the Adams County Sheriff’s Office stated. “Subject has Felony warrants through Brown County and wanted for questioning on several B&E's [breaking and entering]. AIso Dottie Worthington is with this subject and are driving a Black Chevy Cruz.”

The post quickly racked up 2,700 shares and more than 100 comments from bemused followers. 

Sheriff’s officials told Cox Media the post was removed from Facebook due to the overwhelming amount of comments.

>> WATCH: Thieves steal kiddie pool from family's backyard on Father's Day

“Don't you have a better pic? This could be anybody,” one commenter quipped.

“Now they need to put a ‘be on the lookout’ for a bad tattoo artist,” wrote another.

>> Read more trending news 

Ward has been located and is in police custody.

Florida police officer shot in deadly standoff is breathing on his own, sources say

An Orlando, Florida, police officer who was shot in the head earlier this month during a deadly standoff at an apartment complex is now breathing on his own, sources told WFTV.

>> On WFTV.com: Judge approved deal that kept man in deadly Orlando standoff out of prison, records show

Police said Gary Lindsey Jr. shot Officer Kevin Valencia, who has been hospitalized since the June 10 shooting. During a 20-hour standoff, Lindsey shot and killed four children – two of whom were his own – before killing himself, police said.

>> Read more trending news 

A Mass will be celebrated at Orlando's St. James Cathedral on Saturday for the children, who ranged in age from 1 to 12. The Mass is open to the public.

Click here to donate to Valencia’s family.

Click here to donate to the children’s family.

>> On WFTV.com: Long criminal past, rocky relationship led up to shooting of officer, four kids' deaths

WATCH: Thieves steal kiddie pool from family's backyard on Father's Day

A pair of thieves made off with a Nebraska family's inflatable kiddie pool on Father's Day – and the bizarre backyard incident was caught on camera.

>> Click here to watch

According to KETV, Brandon Turner of Omaha said he and his two children were at the zoo Sunday afternoon when he received an alert from his home security camera. He then watched live from his phone as two women drained and dragged the kids' inflatable pool from the Turners' backyard.

>> Man arrested after trying to pay waitress with her own stolen credit card, police say

Turner's youngest, 5-year-old Alex, had a message for the thieves.

"Give my swimming pool back!" he exclaimed, watching the footage in dismay.

>> Read more trending news 

Turner was shocked and disappointed to see people stealing from children.

"Really? Really?" he told KETV. "That's all I could think of – really?"

Read more here.

Man arrested after trying to pay waitress with her own stolen credit card, police say

A suspected thief is behind bars after police say he handed an Arkansas waitress her own stolen card while paying his bill at a Pine Bluff restaurant.

According to The Associated Press, Shamon West, 21, was arrested Tuesday after Shannon's Restaurant waitress Flora Lunsford went to swipe the credit card and noticed her own name on it. She called police, who searched West and found Lunsford's Social Security card and driver's license, as well, the AP reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The arrest came two days after someone took Lunsford's purse from her car, which was parked outside a gas station two blocks from the restaurant, KATV reported.

West now faces charges of theft by receiving and forgery.

Read more here or here

17-year-old unarmed when shot 3 times by officer, police say

A 17-year-old was shot and killed by police in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night after he allegedly ran away from a traffic stop on foot, authorities said.

>> Read more trending news 

The Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Officer identified the teenager as Antwon Rose of Rankin. He attended Woodland Hills High School last year.

Update 5:30 p.m. ET:  The mayor of East Pittsburgh confirmed that the officer involved in the shooting Tuesday night was sworn in to their department a few hours before.

He has been an officer with other departments in the area for seven years.

He still has not been identified.

Update 4 p.m. ET:  The family of Antwon Rose has hired civil rights Attorney Lee Merritt to represent them. Merritt has previously represented the victims of violence in Charlottesville and several cases related to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Update 2:53 p.m. ET:  Rose was shot three times while running from police, said Coleman McDonough, superintendent of the Allegheny County Police Department.

McDonough said two guns were found in the car after the traffic stop, but Rose was not armed at the time of the shooting. The driver of the vehicle was initially detained by police. He has since been released, police said.

A third person who was in the vehicle and fled has not been located.

The East Pittsburgh police officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave.

Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto released the following statement:

“Any loss of life is tragic, and especially the loss of life of a child. This is a devastating situation and I am saddened for Antwon Rose and his family. 

“While Tuesday's shooting was not within the city's official borders it impacts all of us in the Pittsburgh region, and particularly those in the African American community. In my reactions to the incident I should have acknowledged that these shootings affect all of us, no matter where we live, and for that I am sorry. 

“Tuesday night I was receiving numerous calls and messages asking me to respond to the involvement of police in a shooting in East Pittsburgh borough, and at the time I was attempting to clarify for the national public that the City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, which I ultimately oversee, were not involved.”  

Original Story: 

According to the Allegheny County Police Department, Rose got out of a vehicle that matched the description of a vehicle seen near a shooting that occurred shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Kirkpatrick Avenue in North Braddock.

>> Visit WPXI.com for the latest on this developing story

The vehicle, which police said had damage from bullets to the back window, was stopped near Grandview Avenue and Howard Street.

An officer from the East Pittsburgh Police Department was handcuffing the driver when two males ran from the car, police said. One of those males was Rose, according to officials.

Rose was taken to McKeesport Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The Allegheny County Police Department is asking the other person who ran away from the vehicle to turn himself in "so that he can give a comprehensive description of what occurred."

The victim in the North Braddock shooting, a 22-year-old man, was treated for his injuries and released from an area trauma center.

The Allegheny County Police Homicide Unit is investigating both incidents. 

Social media, athletic pressure drives surge in male eating disorders

About 10 million men in the United States will have an eating disorder at some point in their lives.

>> Read more trending news

Cyrus Webb was one of them.

"I was 20 years old. I remember the time … feeling as though I was not happy, and I ended up trying to kill myself," Webb said.

Webb had been self-conscious about his weight at the time, and was afraid he would lose a spot in his marching band.

"I would do fasting, especially when I started doing more things in the public. Basically starving myself. Going running a lot. Sometimes making myself sick. And all because of trying to be the image I thought I needed to be, especially if you were going to be accepted," Webb said.

One in three people struggling with an eating disorder is a male

The latest numbers show Webb's struggle is increasingly more common among men. According to the National Eating Disorder Association or NEDA, one in three people struggling with an eating disorder is male.

NEDA also reports that black teenagers are 50 percent more likely than white teenagers to exhibit binging and purging behaviors. But due in part to cultural bias, they are much less likely to seek treatment for their eating disorder.

Social Media’s Role

"I think the biggest myth that still exists today is that this is an issue among women," Harvard University researcher Alvin Tran said. Tran says social media is playing a role in the trend.

“There are researchers who suspect that social media and other forms of the media are contributing a role. Young men, young boys are seeing images of males in the media. These body images tend to be muscular men with little body fat. Kids are seeing these images as the ideal male body at a very early age," Tran added.

In particular, Tran's research found a significant spike in unhealthy eating habits among men of color on dating apps. 

The Weight of Perfection for Athletes

Athletes are also struggling in greater numbers. 

"People will assume that if an athlete is performing well, that means they’re healthy and that could be very different from the actual truth of the scenario," Matt Stranberg said

Stranberg is a counselor, dietician, and strength conditioning coach with Walden Behavioral Health. He says 33 percent of male athletes in weight class sports are affected by eating disorders.

But there are very few programs in the country that deal specifically with athletes … or men overall.

Cyclist Ben Frederick lived through the struggle after a bike crash left him with a traumatic brain injury.

Frederick was “trying to be one of very few people that can ride a bike for their living … when that goes away and the world opens up to you, it can feel very out of control.""

Frederick said he was able to control the feelings he got if he did not eat. It spiraled until he wound up hospitalized.

“Sitting in that hospital bed having a heartrate of 30 beats per minute was the rock bottom."

Now that he’s recovering, he wanted to share his story, so others might be inspired to find help.

Just shy of two weeks into his recovery, he is back on his bike and sharing his story.

A study of more than 2,400 people hospitalized for an eating disorder found that 97 percent also had conditions such as depression, PTSD or anxiety. 

For more information, contact the NEDA.

NEDA CALL HELPLINE: (800) 931-2237WEBSITE: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/

Delta Airlines bans pit bulls as support or service animals; ASPCA slams dog ‘stereotype’

Update June 21, 4:55 p.m. EST: Matt Bershadker, CEO of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), said Delta’s new policy banning pit bulls spreads “false and life-threatening stereotypes.”

“Every dog is unique, even dogs within the same breed, and their behavior is influenced by many factors,” Bershadker said in a Twitter statement. “Delta Airlines should resist unwarranted breed prejudice and rescind its breed ban.”

Original story: Delta Air Lines will limit each passenger to one emotional support animal and will prohibit pit bulls as service or support animals on flights, effective July 10.

>> Read more trending news

It’s a further tightening of the Atlanta-based airline’s policy on emotional support and service animals.

Delta said the latest policy changes are due to “growing safety concerns” after two employees were bitten by a passenger’s emotional support animal last week.

The incident occurred in Atlanta during boarding of a flight to Tokyo Narita, and one employee was medically treated on site, according to the airline. The passenger and animal were removed from the flight.

Delta said when the new policy takes effect it will no longer accept “pit bull type dogs” as service or support animals.

The changes come after a Delta passenger was mauled by an emotional support dog on a flight last year.

Delta said it carries 700 service or support animals a day. Since 2016, the airline said it saw an 84 percent increase in reported incidents involving service and support animals, including urination or defecation and biting.

“Customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders and more,” Delta said. “Ignoring the true intent of existing rules governing the transport of service and support animals can be a disservice to customers who have real and documented needs.”

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