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Actors Rachel Weisz, Daniel Craig expecting first child

Actor Rachel Weisz has announced that she and her husband, James Bond actor Daniel Craig, are expecting their first child.

The actress revealed the news when she spoke to The New York Times to promote her movie “Disobedience.”

>> Read more trending news 

“I’ll be showing soon. Daniel and I are so happy,” she told The Times. “We’re going to have a little human. We can’t wait to meet him or her. It’s all such a mystery.”

Weisz, 48, and Craig, 50, have been married for seven years and are very private about their personal lives, but Weisz did share that she is happy in her marriage.

“I’m very happy being married,” she said, “Very, very happy,”

Although Weisz applauds celebrity couples who have made their relationships part of their brand, that’s not the case for her marriage

“Daniel and I are really similar. We just literally don’t know how to do that,” Weisz said. “We’re just really crap at talking about our private lives.”

This is the second child for each actor. E! News reported that Weisz has an 11-year-old son with director Darren Aronofsky and Craig has a 25-year-old daughter with actress Fiona London.

How the Rock World Mourned Prince With 'Purple Rain' Covers

In the days and weeks following Prince's April 2016 death, many fellow musicians honored him and his legacy with their own covers of "Purple Rain."

Continue reading…

Karolyis to NBC: 'No way' they knew about doctor's behavior

Former USA Gymnastics women's national team coordinator Martha Karolyi and husband Bela tell NBC they were unaware of the abusive behavior by a former national team doctor now serving decades in prison.

Martha Karolyi led the national team for 15 years before retiring after the 2016 Rio Olympics. She tells Savannah Guthrie in "no way" did she suspect Larry Nassar was sexually abusing athletes under the guise of treatment.

"The whole gymnastics community couldn't recognize this," Martha Karolyi said in an excerpt provided to The Associated Press on Friday by NBC. "Everybody said, 'Larry Nassar is a good doctor. Larry Nassar is a good guy.'"

The Karolyis spoke as part of a Dateline NBC special entitled "Silent No More" scheduled to air Sunday. The one-hour special, the first prime-time event hosted by Guthrie, takes a look at the fallout from revelations about years of abuse by Nassar involving hundreds of former athletes, including several members of the U.S. Olympic team.

"The whole thing is just like an explosion, a bomb exploding," Bela Karolyi said. "Boom."

The Karolyis have been named as co-defendants in several civil lawsuits filed against Nassar and USA Gymnastics, including one by former national team member Mattie Larson.

Larson told The Associated Press she watched a portion of the Karolyi's interview excerpted on Friday and shrugged. The Karolyis made similar statements in a deposition in Larson's lawsuit.

"Who knows if they knew or not? I'm not in their heads," Larson told the AP. "I feel like if they really didn't know, it's because they set up the system to show they don't care what's going on."

Larson, a member of the 2010 World Championship team, pointed out the Karolyis allowed Nassar to treat them in his hotel room without supervision and that it wasn't unusual for Nassar to treat athletes not on a training table, but his hotel bed.

"Honestly I just believe they did not care about us when we were not in the gym," Larson said.

Several victims, including two-time Olympic medalist McKayla Maroney, say they were abused at the Karolyi's Ranch near Houston. The ranch served as the training home for USA Gymnastics during most of Martha Karolyi's highly successful tenure running the national team.

Several gymnasts and coaches previously interviewed by The Associated Press said the Karolyis institutionalized a win-at-all-costs culture that forced girls to train while injured. The toxic environment allowed Nassar to flourish in part because the athletes were afraid to challenge authority, according to witness statements in Nassar's criminal case and one of the lawsuits.

Guthrie spent hours with the Karolyis at the ranch after the couple agreed to speak publicly for the first time since Martha Karolyi's retirement following the 2016 Olympics.

"I think they felt like it was time for them to tell their side of the story," Guthrie said. "I think they've watched and seen as their reputation has really taken a hit and people have asked a lot of questions about what they knew and just as importantly what they should have known."

Guthrie said she was "surprised" the Karolyis came forward despite the potential legal fallout.

"They answered every question," Guthrie said. "At no time did their lawyer jump in and say 'You can't answer that.'"

Nassar spent nearly three decades at USA Gymnastics before being fired in 2015 after complaints about his behavior. He continued to work at Michigan State University through the fall of 2016 before being hit with federal charges. Nassar is now serving decades in prison for molesting women and girls and for possessing child pornography.

Nassar was already established in the program when Martha Karolyi took over. He would visit the ranch during national team training sessions and also accompany the team to events around the world. Maroney said she was abused "hundreds" of times by Nassar.

Martha Karolyi denied having any knowledge about Nassar's pattern of abuse.

"I heard during the testimonies (at Nassar's sentencing) that some of the parents were in the therapy room with their own child and Larry Nassar was performing this," Martha Karolyi told Guthrie. "And the parent couldn't see. How I could see?"

Barbara Bush believed literacy could cure other ills

On a hot summer day in 1978, as her husband mulled his first presidential run, Barbara Bush headed to Houston's leafy Memorial Park for a jog while she thought about what issues she'd like to focus on should she become first lady.

Bush was concerned about stubborn societal problems like crime, the homeless, drugs and hunger. But as she ran, the then-53-year-old came to the realization that teaching more people to read could help decrease the other major problems, which can grow out of lack of literacy and educational opportunity.

"After much thought, I realized everything I worried about would be better if more people could read, write and comprehend," Bush wrote in her 1994 autobiography, "Barbara Bush: A Memoir."

It would be another decade before Bush became first lady, but, in the interval, she was active in literacy programs. In March 1989, mere weeks into her husband's presidency, she founded the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy.

"We love that story," said Lauren Sproull, the foundation's spokeswoman. "It really shows that, from the very beginning, the moment she even thought that she might become first lady one day, she immediately turned her thoughts to, 'How can I do the most good?' 'How can I help the most people?'"

The foundation has since raised more than $110 million to create or support literacy programs for men, women and children in all 50 states. Its programs include classes to help teenage mothers who left high school earn GED diplomas in Georgia, and teaching non-English speakers in Alabama the language and how to transfer what they learn to their pre-kindergarten-age children before they start school.

One in four American adults can't read above a fifth-grade level, the foundation says. A 2003 study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that nearly 15 percent of Americans lacked basic reading and comprehension skills. It took more than a decade to compile, though, and hasn't been repeated.

For years, the foundation offered grants to fund new literacy programs or bolster existing ones, but since 2012 has focused on creating direct models that use technology to reach adults and children, many of whom weren't always able to attend traditional, classroom-style programs.

The foundation says it has helped "easily hundreds of thousands" of people across the country over the years, but doesn't have a full count of everyone enrolled in programs it supported.

Bush died Tuesday at her Houston home at the age of 92. To mark her 90th birthday in June 2015, the foundation launched the $7 million adult literacy XPRIZE, a competition in which teams are tasked with creating mobile apps that can improve adult literacy within 12 months. The foundation has announced eight semifinalists whose apps are being field-tested among about 11,000 people in Dallas, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

Bush remained active with the foundation until as recently as two months ago, participating via video chat at one of its reading events. Her daughter, Doro Bush Koch, is now the foundation's honorary chairwoman, and it is based in Tallahassee, where her son, Jeb, lived as Florida governor from 1999 until 2007.

Bush also wrote two books about her dogs' lives, 1984's "C. Fred's Story" and "Millie's Book," in 1990, and donated the proceeds to family literacy programs. In 2013, her son Neil, and his wife Maria, created the Barbara Bush Houston Literacy Foundation, which promotes literacy among people of all ages in the country's fourth-largest city.

Laura Bush, who was first lady while Barbara's son George W. was president, told Fox Business Network on Wednesday that her mother-in-law believed "if everyone could read and write, a lot of problems would be solved."

Bake off star recounts being detained for taking baggies of powder through airport security

She looks like the grandma who has to cook for everyone, but Mary Berry, star of “The Great British Bake Off,” has a dark past.

Berry recently recounted the time that airport security detained her for taking bags of powder through airport security, Metro reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Berry told Graham Norton, “I was arrested 25 years ago. I was going to the US to do some cookery demonstrations and was worried that there might be problems so I weighed out all the ingredients - flour, sugar - and put them all in little plastic bags.”

You can imagine what came next.

The K-9’s zeroed in on her bags, Independent reported.

“Suddenly I was surrounded by uniformed people and my assistant and I were put in separate cells. It was alarming. When I was asked if I was going to make money from the stuff, I said, ‘I do and my fee has already been agreed,’” Berry told Norton.

Berry was on “The Graham Norton Show” to promote her new BBC series, “Britain’s Best Home Cook.”

Nobel body: 'unacceptable behavior' not widely known

An investigation into sexual misconduct allegations at the Swedish body that hands out the coveted Nobel Prize in Literature found Friday that "unacceptable behavior in the form of unwanted intimacy" has taken place within the ranks of the prestigious institution.

The secretive 18-member board has in recent weeks been embroiled in a sex-abuse scandal that investigators concluded was "not generally known." It has led to the departure of six of members of the Academy and tarnished the prize's reputation.

Sweden's prime minister, the king and the Nobel board have all expressed their concerns over a scandal that has sparked all around outrage in the Scandinavian nation that is known for its promotion of gender equality. On Thursday, thousands gathered outside the Swedish Academy to demand that all of its remaining members resign.

The academy commissioned lawyers to investigate sexual misconduct claims from 18 women against Jean-Claude Arnault, a major cultural figure in Sweden who is married to Katarina Frostenson, a poet who is a member of the academy.

Frostenson stepped down last week at the same time as another woman — the academy's permanent secretary Sara Danius.

The case has exposed bitter divisions within the academy, whose members are appointed for life, and given rise to accusations of patriarchal leanings among some members.

The protest has grown out of what began as Sweden's own #MeToo moment in November when the country saw thousands of sexual misconduct allegations surfacing from all walks of life. It hit the academy when 18 women came forward in a Swedish newspaper with accusations against Arnault.

He was banned in December by the academy from attending a Nobel banquet after Dagens Nyheter, one of Sweden's largest, published the allegations.

He has denied the alleged assaults, which reportedly occurred between 1996 and 2017. Swedish prosecutors said last month that an investigation into reported rape and sexual abuse by Arnault from 2013 to 2015 had been dropped, but a probe into other criminal acts would continue.

On the sidelines of the probe, the academy said Friday it found a letter it had received in December 1996, in which the sender drew attention to suspected sexual assault at Arnault's cultural center that had received funding from the academy.

It added it "deeply regrets that the letter was put aside, which meant that no action was taken to investigate," and distanced itself from sexual harassment and sexual violence "wherever it occurs."

Arnault who was not named in the academy's press statement, has also been suspected of violating century-old Nobel rules by leaking names of winners of the prestigious award — including 2016 recipient Bob Dylan. He has allegedly leaked winners' names seven times, starting in 1996. It was not clear who the names were disclosed to.

The investigators noted "violations of the academy's secrecy rules have been noted regarding the work of the Nobel Prize in Literature." It didn't elaborate.

The academy said that following what it called "a serious crisis," it had decided to hand over the report to relevant judicial authorities.

Judge forces David Copperfield to reveal 'Lucky #13' magic trick

David Copperfield was forced to shatter his most famous illusion.

>> Read more trending news

The famed magician was ordered in court Tuesday to break the Magicians Oath in court Tuesday, the BBC reported. A judge ordered Copperfield to explain one of his most famous tricks -- the Lucky #13 -- during a trial involving a man who claimed he was injured during the stunt.

British tourist Gavin Cox, 58, filed a negligence lawsuit against the illusionist, Time reported. Cox claimed he fell while participating in the Lucky #13 trick at the MGM Grand Resort and Casino in Las Vegas in 2013, the BBC reported. In the trick, Copperfield makes 13 audience members, chosen at random, disappear on stage and then reappear at the back of the room, the BBC reported. 

Cox told NBC News that he has suffered chronic pain and brain injury and has spent more than $400,000 on medical bills.

Copperfield’s attorney argued that revealing the secret would be financially detrimental, but a Las Vegas district court ruled against the magician

A Las Vegas district court rejected Copperfield’s defense, which argued that disclosing the secret behind the trick would be financially detrimental to him. He was ordered to explain how the trick was done.

Spoiler alert: Copperfield’s executive producer testified that when the curtain falls, the 13 volunteers are taken through passageways that circle the MGM building. They exit the building and then re-enter at the back of the theater, Time reported.

“There was a duty by the defendants to provide a safe environment to the audience participants,” Cox’s lawyer, Benedict Morelli, said in the opening statements.

German theater asks guests to wear swastikas for Hitler play

A theater in southern Germany is proceeding with plans to open a satirical play Friday about Adolf Hitler's youth in which some patrons will be wearing swastika armbands, despite objections and legal complaints.

The Konstanz Theater's production of George Tabori's "Mein Kampf " opens Friday night for a monthlong run.

Though named after Hitler's infamous anti-Semitic manifesto, the play tells a fictional story of how a young Hitler is befriended in Vienna by a Jewish man who takes pity on him for his futile pursuit of a career as an artist and puts him on his political path, as well as helping him with his hairstyle.

Tabori, who was born into a Jewish family in Budapest in 1914, was known for his avant-garde works that confronted anti-Semitism. He died in 2007. Though Tabori was able to flee the Nazis himself, his father and other family members were killed in the Auschwitz death camp.

His dark farce "Mein Kampf" has been performed many times, and was made into a German-language film a decade ago.

But in a twist introduced by the Konstanz Theater, patrons who agree to wear a swastika armband will be given free admittance, while those who purchase tickets will be asked to wear a Jewish Star of David.

Theater manager Christoph Nix says the point is to show how easily corruptible people are, and provoke dialogue about racism.

"The theater is the only place where such a discussion can take place immediately," he told the dpa news agency.

The opening of the play is also on Hitler's birthday, which Nix said was a wish of Tabori's, who was a personal friend.

The display of the swastika is generally prohibited in Germany, though there are exceptions such as when it's clearly part of an anti-Nazi protest, or where artistic freedom is involved.

Multiple people filed complaints with the Konstanz prosecutors over the theater making use of the armbands in its production, but they decided earlier this week that the concept fell under the expression of artistic freedom.

Still, the local German-Israeli Society and the Society for Christian-Jewish Cooperation have both called for a boycott of the production.

The theatre says about four dozen people have signed up to wear the swastika, meaning there will only be a handful at any of the play's 14 performances.

The theater is also planning strict security checks at the entrance, and also as people exit to ensure that the armbands are returned.

Ariana Grande releases new song, first since 2017 bombing

Ariana Grande has released her first song since a 2017 terrorist attack during her concert in the United Kingdom.

The 24-year-old posted a video of "No Tears Left to Cry" on Instagram on Friday.

The emotional song includes the lyrics: "Right now I'm in a state of mind/ I wanna be in like all the time/ Ain't got no tears left to cry/ So I'm pickin' it up, I'm pickin' up."

Grande suspended her Dangerous Woman Tour after a terrorist bombing killed 22 and injured more than 500 at Manchester Arena in May 2017. She returned for the One Love Manchester charity concert weeks later.

Diverse cast of Dayton kids taking on Cinderella and her glass slipper this weekend

A glass slipper is going lead to a whole lot of magic near downtown this weekend. 

Stivers School for the Arts is taking on Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” during shows Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. 

Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for students.  

>> This former NFL player is tackling Dayton community problems head-on

“It is a great story, and it has great music,” said Paula Powell, the production’s manager. “Each actor brings (his or her) own personality (to the characters). We have a pretty diverse group of kids in the cast.”  

Many of the actresses and actors don’t reflect the classic story’s traditional typecasting.

Based on “The Wonderful World of Disney: Cinderella,” a 1997 movie starring Whitney Houston and Brandy Norwood, Stivers’ diverse show includes a black girl,  Kiama Wa-Tenza, as Cinderella and Fischer Barnett, a teen boy, as the stepmother. 

>> 50 things to do in Dayton in 2018

The diverse casting was no big deal at Stivers, said Powell, Stivers director of choirs, noting that the arts transcends.

“We are pretty easy-going here,” she said. “People auditioned and the characters just sorted themselves out.”

About 70 students from each of the  school’s magnet programs are represented in the production that includes music from a student orchestra. 

The show includes audio and visual elements and Puppets from Zoot Theatre Company.

>> Subscribe to the What Had Happened Was podcast for more interviews from Amelia Robinson

Beside Wa-Tenza and  Barnett,  key actors and actresses include  Trinity Hines Anthony as Fairy Godmother; David Lewis as the Prince; Isaac Bement  as  Lionel, the royal steward;  Clara Bement  as Joy, a step sister; Ana Smith as Grace, the other step sister; Logan Van Bibber as King; Erin Fultz as Queen;  Brandan Jeffries and Lamorris Render as Mice; Ryan Gibson as Charles the cat and Desmond Kingston as Dove. 

>> The wait is over! Cafe is now open at new downtown Dayton library 

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