Last Song Played
DAYTON'S CLASSIC HITS
On Air
No Program
Last Song Played
DAYTON'S CLASSIC HITS

entertainment

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Brooke Astor collection heads to research room at library

The New York Public Library is beginning construction on a new study and research room that will house 1,800 books and three portraits that philanthropist Brooke Astor willed to the library after her death at age 105 in 2007.

Library officials say they will begin construction on the Lenox and Astor Room on the second floor of the main library building next month. The room is named after the library's two founders, James Lenox and John Jacob Astor.

Brooke Astor was married to Vincent Astor, the great-great grandson of John Jacob Astor.

The books, collected by Astor's second husband, Charles Henry Marshall, are special-edition classics of history and literature.

Library officials say the room will be a quiet place for study, research and small seminars.

______

This story has been corrected to show that the new Lenox and Astor Room is named after John Jacob Astor, not Brooke Astor.

Charles Krauthammer, conservative columnist and pundit, dies

Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from "Great Society" Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, has died.

He was 68.

His Thursday death was announced by two organizations that were longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post.

Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live.

"I leave this life with no regrets," Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. "It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended."

Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for "his witty and insightful" commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume's nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009.

Krauthammer is credited with coining the term "The Reagan Doctrine" for President Reagan's policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his "first-class intellect and first-class temperament" and denounced for having a "highly suspect" character.

Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson's unsuccessful presidential campaign.

But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the "Great Society" programs enacted during the 1960s.

"As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state," he wrote in the introduction to "Things That Matter," a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013.

For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in "Things That Matter" listed chess, baseball, "the innocence of dogs" and "the cunning of cats" among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder.

But he found nothing could live apart from government and the civic realm. "Science, medicine, art, poetry, architecture" and other fields were "fundamentally subordinate. In the end, they must bow to the sovereignty of politics."

Ever blunt in his criticisms, Krauthammer was an "intense disliker" the liberal columnist E.J. Dionne told Politico in 2009. And opponents had words for him. Christopher Hitchens once called him the "newest of the neocon mini-windbags," with the "arduous job, in an arduous time, of being an unpredictable conformist."

He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion "The Three Week War" and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration's use of torture as an "uncontrolled experiment" carried out "sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe."

And the former president praised Krauthammer after hearing of his death.

"For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy," George W. Bush said in a statement. "His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country."

Krauthammer was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012.

But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that "If you're going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don't say what you think and if you don't say it honestly and bluntly."

He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as "today's tarted-up version of creationism." In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president's friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O'Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated "Never Trumpers," Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former "Apprentice" star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency.

"I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully," he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. "I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him."

Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who "pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn't. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!"

Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator.

The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his "mindless, humorless Maoism."

In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter's vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale.

Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor.

"These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity," he wrote in 2013. "A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin.

"When a young journalist asks me today, 'How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?' I have my answer: 'First, go to medical school.'"

____

AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

Michelle Obama discusses new memoir at library conference

Former first lady Michelle Obama will discuss her upcoming memoir "Becoming" as she kicks off the American Library Association's annual conference in New Orleans.

Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden will moderate a conversation Friday with Obama at the city's convention center.

Obama's book chronicles the experiences that have shaped her, from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive and her time at the White House. It's being released in the U.S. through the Crown Publishing Group, a Penguin Random House division.

The publisher says, "'Becoming' is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations — and whose story inspires us to do the same."

The conference is expected to draw more than 15,000 participants.

APNewsBreak: Meadowlands plans sports betting near NYC

The Meadowlands Racetrack plans to bring legal sports betting to New York City's doorstep next month.

Jeff Gural, who manages the northern New Jersey track, tells The Associated Press that he plans to begin offering sports betting on July 15. That's significantly earlier than a timetable the track laid out just over a week ago when a competing track and an Atlantic City casino became the first in New Jersey to take sports bets following its legalization.

The development came as New York state adjourned its legislative session Wednesday without adopting a sports betting bill, leaving its vast population base available for the Meadowlands track, which Gural predicted will quickly become the state's busiest sports betting outlet.

"New York did me such a favor by not passing sports betting," Gural said. "That leaves me the entirety of New York City, Long Island, Westchester County. There are 15 million people that live within 20 miles (32 kilometers) of the Meadowlands. They gave me a tremendous gift."

It would be a gift for his New Jersey track, anyway; Gural also owns the Tioga Downs track in upstate New York, and was counting on sports betting to help revive it.

New York's failure to act gives New Jersey at least a short-term advantage: many of the customers expected to place sports bets at the track will come from New York, yet the tax money sports book operators are charged on those bets (9.75 to 13 percent, depending on where and how the bets are placed) will go to New Jersey.

New Jersey gambling regulators confirmed Gural's timetable to begin offering sports betting, calling it doable. So far, Monmouth Park racetrack in Oceanport, near the Jersey shore, and Atlantic City's Borgata casino are the only ones in New Jersey offering sports betting.

The Ocean Resort Casino, formerly known as Revel, will become the third on June 28 when it reopens on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. The Meadowlands would be next in line just over two weeks later.

Ironically, it was the failed pursuit of a casino at the Meadowlands that led to concern for its future, and it will be sports betting that will ease those concerns somewhat. Gural and Hard Rock International proposed a casino at the track complex in East Rutherford, just over 6 miles (9 kilometers) from New York City, but the proposal was resoundingly rejected by voters, and is unlikely to resurface anytime soon. New Jersey's Democratic state Senate President Steve Sweeney told The Associated Press in December that the political support for the casino project does not exist, and even Gural and Hard Rock say it could be five years or more before that might start to change.

New Jersey won a U.S. Supreme Court case in May clearing the way for all 50 states to legalize sports betting if they desire. Delaware was the first state to do so following the ruling; New Jersey was close behind.

The Meadowlands has partnered with Betfair US to offer sports betting at the track. It is a subsidiary of Paddy Power Betfair, one of the largest publicly traded sports betting companies in the world.

Gural said sports betting will help the track's bottom line, but added it will not, by itself, save the horse racing industry in New Jersey, which continues to struggle competing against neighboring states that subsidize their tracks. New Jersey's tracks used to receive $30 million a year from the state's casinos, but former Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, ended those payments in 2011.

Without some sort of subsidy, Gural said, the track could be forced to just offer sports betting and simulcasting.

The track eventually plans to offer online sports betting, but will only offer sports betting at the track in the early going.

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC

China blocks John Oliver on social media after scathing show

A popular Chinese social media site is censoring discussion of "Last Week Tonight" and its HBO host John Oliver after he mocked Chinese President Xi Jinping, his apparent sensitivity about being compared to Winnie the Pooh and his country's crackdown on human rights.

Attempts to send posts with either the terms "John Oliver" or "Last Week Tonight" on the Sina Weibo microblog Friday were met with failure messages saying "the content contains information that violates relevant laws and regulations."

Oliver's show on Sunday made satirical references to Xi and the way that Chinese internet users often joke that he resembles Winnie the Pooh. The show also referred to China's internment of hundreds of thousands of members of the Muslim Uighur minority groups in political indoctrination camps .

Oliver called Xi "the man who is now emperor for life," referring to the Chinese leader's power grab earlier this year when presidential term limits were eliminated.

On YouTube, the video of the 20-minute segment was viewed more than 3.3 million times by Friday.

The show also turned a critical eye to Xi's signature anti-corruption crackdown that has ensnared political rivals and his hallmark program of overseas infrastructure projects known as the "Belt and Road" initiative.

Oliver's show included a parody of a propaganda music video made to promote the initiative in which children sing about China being an autocracy that abuses its citizens' human rights. "This is the China Xi doesn't want you to see," they sing in chorus.

It also discussed moves to build up a cult of personality around Xi, the ruling Communist Party's attacks on human rights campaigners and the death of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo last year while serving a prison term for subversion.

The censoring of social media posts was the latest sign of the country's increasing sensitivity over political content and satire. China maintains some of the world's toughest restrictions on content online as well as on foreign news and entertainment broadcasters such as HBO.

Weibo did not immediately respond Friday to a request for comment.

Hard Rock casino installs big guitar with misspelled word

The soon-to-open Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City had to work quickly to fix a misspelling on a 30-foot-tall (9-meter-tall) guitar installed this week.

The sign, modeled after a Gibson Les Paul guitar, was put up Thursday morning without officials noticing the word "rhythm" was misspelled on the rhythm and treble switch. It included the letter "E." The guitar is one of two expected to go up at the new resort, with the second slated for installation Saturday at the resort's entrance.

Hard Rock officials say the typo was corrected Thursday afternoon by removing the extra vinyl letter.

The Hard Rock Hotel & Casino will open at noon on June 28 the same day as the new Ocean Resort Casino.

Reactions to the death of pundit Charles Krauthammer.

Reactions to the death of conservative writer and pundit Charles Krauthammer.

___

"Laura and I are deeply saddened by the loss of an intellectual giant and dear friend, Charles Krauthammer. For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy. His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country." — President George W. Bush, in a written statement.

___

"Charles Krauthammer was one of the great thinkers of our time. A giant in his intellect and his character. A good and gracious man. And a dear friend. This is such a loss." — Speaker of the House Paul Ryan on Twitter.

___

"I was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend Charles Krauthammer this afternoon." — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Twitter.

___

"He was such a decent man. His commentary was principled and piercing. What a loss." — David Gregory, CNN political analyst, on Twitter.

___

"We've lost a national treasure." — Megyn Kelly, NBC news anchor, on Twitter.

___

"No greater master of the form." — New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, on Twitter.

___

"A loss of wisdom and talent." — Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, on Twitter.

___

"One of baseball's greatest fans — Charles Krauthammer — passed away today ... He was loved and admired by many and will be truly missed here at Nationals Park." — Official Twitter account of the Washington Nationals Major League Baseball team, on Twitter.

___

"Charles Krauthammer was a man of extraordinary intellect. Truly one of a kind. The conservative movement & the nation will miss his incredible insight, especially in times such as these." — Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, on Twitter.

___

"Very sad to report the death of Charles Krauthammer — award winning journalist and a courageous, caring man," — Judy Woodruff, anchor of PBS Newshour, on Twitter.

___

"Terribly sad news. The great Charles Krauthammer has died." — Brit Hume, political analyst for Fox News, on Twitter.

___

"We have lost a great mind, a great conservative and a great American. I, like millions of Americans, will miss the wit and wisdom of Charles Krauthammer." — Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, on Twitter.

___

"Charles Krauthammer's columns and commentary shaped American politics for generations." — CNN media analyst Brian Stelter, on Twitter.

___

"A remarkable man, whom we all shall miss." — Actor James Woods, on Twitter.

___

"Everyone at Fox News is saddened to report that our dear friend — a giant of our industry — Charles Krauthammer has passed away." Fox News chief White House correspondent John Roberts, on Twitter.

___

"RIP good friend. I am sure you will be owning the panel discussion in heaven as well. And we'll make sure your wise words and thoughts — your legacy — will live on here." — Bret Baier, chief political anchor, Fox News, on Twitter.

ABC orders 'Roseanne' spinoff for fall minus Roseanne Barr

ABC, which canceled its "Roseanne" revival over its star's racist tweet, said Thursday it will air a Conner family sitcom minus Roseanne Barr this fall.

ABC ordered 10 episodes of the spinoff after Barr relinquished any creative or financial participation in it, which the network had said was a condition of such a series.

In a statement issued by the show's producer, Barr said she agreed to the settlement to save the jobs of 200 cast and crew members who were idled when "Roseanne" was canceled last month.

"I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from 'Roseanne,' she said, adding, "I wish the best for everyone involved."

The revival of the hit 1988-97 sitcom "Roseanne" was swiftly axed by ABC last month after Barr posted a tweet likening former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to a product of the Muslim Brotherhood and "Planet of the Apes."

Tom Werner, executive producer of the original series and the revival, said in the statement that he was grateful to reach the deal to keep the team working "as we continue to explore stories of the Conner family."

ABC said that the new series, with "The Conners" as its working title, will star John Goodman, Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert, Lecy Goranson and Michael Fishman.

How Barr's character, the family matriarch, will be erased from their lives was left unexplained for now by ABC.

"After a sudden turn of events, the Conners are forced to face the daily struggles of life in Lanford in a way they never have before," the network said in its announcement, referring to the fictional Illinois town where the family lives.

The spinoff will continue to portray contemporary issues that are as relevant today as they were 30 years ago," ABC said, a nod to the unusual portrayal of a blue-collar family on TV.

In a joint statement, the cast expressed support for the project.

"We have received a tremendous amount of support from fans of our show, and it's clear that these characters not only have a place in our hearts, but in the hearts and homes of our audience," they said.

After getting the chance last season to tell stories about challenges facing working-class family, they're glad to "continue to share those stories through love and laughter," the actors said.

The new show was ordered from producer Werner Entertainment without a pilot episode, the typical basis for a series to be greenlit.

Barr's tweet had been condemned by ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey as "abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values."

Barr initially apologized and deleted the post, which had followed her pattern of making controversial political and social statements on social media. Some observers questioned why ABC had ordered the revival given her history.

But the comedy's return was an instant smash for ABC, owned by the Walt Disney Co., and was counted on to lead the network's fortunes next season.

Its first new episode last March was seen by more than 25 million people, with delayed viewing counted in, numbers that are increasingly rare in network television.

Kantar Media said "Roseanne" earned an estimated $45 million in advertising revenue for ABC through last season's nine-episode run.

The show tackled hot-button topics such as the opioid epidemic, single parenting and the Trump presidency, with the fictional Roseanne's support mirrored by that of Barr in real life.

The reboot also prompted some outrage, including over a joke about two other TV comedies featuring minority characters that was deemed dismissive and an episode some people called Islamophobic.

___

Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber .

Michael Nesmith of the Monkees Hospitalized, Tour Canceled

Michael Nesmith collapsed during his soundcheck at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside, Pa.

Continue reading…

Charles Krauthammer, prominent conservative voice, has died

Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from "Great Society" Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, died Thursday.

He was 68.

His death was announced by two organizations that were longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post.

Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live.

"I leave this life with no regrets," Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. "It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended."

Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for "his witty and insightful" commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume's nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009.

Krauthammer is credited with coining the term "The Reagan Doctrine" for President Reagan's policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his "first-class intellect and first-class temperament" and denounced for having a "highly suspect" character.

Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson's unsuccessful presidential campaign.

But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the "Great Society" programs enacted during the 1960s.

"As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state," he wrote in the introduction to "Things That Matter," a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013.

For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in "Things That Matter" listed chess, baseball, "the innocence of dogs" and "the cunning of cats" among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder.

But he found nothing could live apart from government and the civic realm. "Science, medicine, art, poetry, architecture" and other fields were "fundamentally subordinate. In the end, they must bow to the sovereignty of politics."

Ever blunt in his criticisms, Krauthammer was an "intense disliker" the liberal columnist E.J. Dionne told Politico in 2009. And opponents had words for him. Christopher Hitchens once called him the "newest of the neocon mini-windbags," with the "arduous job, in an arduous time, of being an unpredictable conformist."

He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion "The Three Week War" and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration's use of torture as an "uncontrolled experiment" carried out "sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe."

And the former president praised Krauthammer after hearing of his death.

"For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy," George W. Bush said in a statement. "His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country."

Krauthammer was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012.

But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that "If you're going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don't say what you think and if you don't say it honestly and bluntly."

He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as "today's tarted-up version of creationism." In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president's friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O'Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated "Never Trumpers," Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former "Apprentice" star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency.

"I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully," he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. "I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him."

Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who "pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn't. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!"

Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator.

The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his "mindless, humorless Maoism."

In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter's vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale.

Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor.

"These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity," he wrote in 2013. "A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin.

"When a young journalist asks me today, 'How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?' I have my answer: 'First, go to medical school.'"

____

AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >