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Dayton Mall’s Rusty Bucket restaurant to host 3-day hiring fair

The Rusty Bucket Restaurant & Tavern in front of the Dayton Mall will host a hiring fair from Tuesday, June 5  through Thursday, June 7 at 2812 Miamisburg-Centerville Road. 

>> NEW TODAY: PHOTOS: Did we spot you at the grand opening of Dayton’s newest brewery?

 Available positions include line cooks, servers, bartenders and host or hostess. 

Interested candidates are invited to visit the restaurant from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. for open interviews.

 >> NEW TODAY: PHOTOS: Did we spot you having a BERRY good time at the Troy Strawberry Festival?

Headquartered in Columbus, Rusty Bucket operates 23 locations in Ohio, Michigan, Florida, Indiana, North Carolina and Colorado. All Rusty Bucket restaurant locations are open for lunch and dinner daily, as well as for weekend brunch. 

>> WHERE TO EAT THIS WEEK: Hidden in plain sight Beavercreek restaurant pumping out big flavors

Earlier this year, Rusty Bucket launched online ordering at all its restaurants, providing customers the option to place their orders and pay ahead of time online for pick-up in the restaurant. In addition, the restaurant chain also has introduced the Rusty Bucket mobile app, which allows guests to place orders directly from their smartphones.

>> NEW TODAY: Festival planned to reopen former outdoor drama Blue Jacket site

For more information, please visit www.myrustybucket.com or call the Dayton-area restaurant at 937.436.2426.

Vermont wants remote workers, will pay $10,000 to move

If you ever thought working from your home in the middle of Vermont, your dream may soon come true thanks to a new law in the Green Mountain State. And the state will pay you to move there. 

If eligible, workers who relocate can get up to $5,000 a year over two years, with a $10,000 maximum because of the state’s new remote worker grant program, CNN Money reported.

>> Read more trending news 

But if you live in Vermont, then you’re not eligible, Burlington Free Press reported.

“We think Vermont is well-positioned to capitalize on the increase in the availability of remote work,” Michael Schirling said.

Schirling is the state’s Agency of Commerce and Community Development secretary.

He says the state thinks that it will be a good offer for couples where one member has a more traditional job offer in Vermont while the second can work remotely, the Free Press reported

Here’s how to qualify:

  • Must work in a home office or a co-working space
  • Full-time employee of a company based outside Vermont
  • Full-time Vermont residents after Jan. 1, 2019.

What is covered by the $5,000-$10,000 grant:

  • Moving expenses
  • Membership fees for co-working spaces,
  • Computer software
  • Computer hardware
  • Broadband

Money will distributed on a first-come, first-served basis and there are limits each year for the total amount of money available, CNN Money reported.

UPDATE: Developer says he has purchased Hara Arena

Michael Heitz, a Lexington-Ky.-based developer, has bought Hara Arena, Heitz said Wednesday.

Heitz said he bought the income tax liens from Montgomery County and hopes to close on further liens from banks on Friday.

RELATEDMoney troubles surround Hara Arena: What we know

Asked about his plans for Hara and its 120 or so acres of property, he said: “No 1, clean it up and secure the property.”

He declined to say what he has invested in the site thus far. 

The Dayton Daily News reported in March that Hara property owners-trustees owed back taxes and around $350,000 to banks.

Heitz typically buys distressed properties and gets them “shovel ready” for users. He said he plans a Monday afternoon press conference to discuss his purchase and his plans.

RELATEDHara redeveloper will face challenges 

Hara closed in 2016, taking with it a $36 million annual economic impact and decades of memories.

Heitz has purchased other local properties, such as the Rita Construction building in North Dayton, a former inn at Wagner Ford Road off Interstate 75 and the old Executive Lodge at 2401 Needmore Road in a similar tax lien sale.

Heitz may be best known locally for demolishing the former Howard Paper plant smokestack off Edwin C. Moses Boulevard in 2011. He said he drove by that property for years on I-75 before deciding to do something about it. He finally bought it on July 1, 2010.

RELATEDHeitz conducts business with a handshake

“I thought it gave Dayton a bad rap,” Heitz told the Dayton Daily News in 2013.

Heitz also prepared North Dayton property where Dayton Children’s Hospital is building a two-story clinic, a project that ended up mired in a legal dispute. 

Dayton Children’s Hospital sued Heitz and his firm Garrett Day LLC,  alleging the developer defrauded the hospital when it didn’t properly clear the site at the corner of Stanley Avenue and Valley Street.

LUXURY HOMES IN DAYTON AREA

PHOTOS: Check out this luxury Washington Twp. home

PHOTOS: Check out this luxury Kettering house with home theater

PHOTOS: See inside the former manstion built by Charles F. Kettering

You won’t believe the inside of this INCREDIBLE Oakwood house

This $2 million Warren County estate is a rural paradise with a resort-style pool

All aboard: Disney Cruise Line looks for workers to man its ship kid clubs

If you’ve dreamed of working on the high seas, then Disney is looking for you.

The cruise line that Mickey built is hiring youth activities counselors to live and work on its fleet of cruise ships, Metro reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The hours are long, according to Metro, at 80 hours a week, but the job offers fun and amazing ports of call in Mexico, Barcelona and Disney’s private island Castaway Cay.

The job posting opened in December, but it appears that the cruise line is still recruiting.

But not anyone can apply or be hired. You have to have two years’ recent experience working with children in a “high-volume, fast-paced recreational/camp environment.”

Among the other qualifications:

  • Must be able to command the attention of large groups of children
  • At least 20 years old
  • Work a seven-day 70-84 hour work week with limited time off
  • Adhere to Disney Cruise Line appearance guidelines

It would also help to be bilingual in Spanish or Portuguese and have experience working with children with special needs.

If chosen, cruise line cast members live with a roommate on board the ship and also must be willing and able to follow and lead the shipboard emergency procedures.

The positions are for any of the four Disney ships: the Wonder, Magic, Fantasy or Dream, and Disney’s private Bahamian island, the Liverpool Echo reported.

Click here to apply.

Apple hiring for work from home positions

Apple is looking for additions to its workforce and you don’t even have to leave home. 

The tech company is looking to fill about 50 AppleCare at-home positions to offer tech support of devices like iPhones, iPads and MacBooks, the Houston Chronicle reported

>> Read more trending news 

While working from home is a big enough perk for some, the job also comes with Apple discounts, paid time off and potential career growth, even for those who work part time, according to Apple’s job announcement.

Apple At Home employees work directly for Apple for the company’s normal support hours. There could be extra shifts for holidays, what’s considered “peak business hours,” and training.

Workers are required to have a distraction-free room that is quiet and that can be closed off to keep noise down, high-speed internet with at least 5 mps download/1 mps upload, a desk and an ergonomic chair. 

Apple provides the iMac and headset that is only for work.

Click here to see what jobs are open and to apply.

Sam’s Club locations reportedly closing without notice

Sam’s Club store locations are reportedly closing across the nation, including some in Ohio.

Two Sam’s Club stores in Cincinnati have permanently closed without notice, WCPO reports.

The Loveland store on Fields-Ertel Road and the Oakley store on Marburg Avenue both permanently closed Thursday, WCPO reported. No locations in the Dayton region have been impacted. Sam’s Club has locations in Dayton, Beavercreek and Centerville.

The closures come as Walmart, which owns and operates Sam’s Club, announced it is increasing its starting salaries for U.S. workers. Employees will now make $11 an hour.

» RELATED: Walmart to roll out ‘Scan & Go’ technology in another 100 stores

Sam’s Club issued the following statement about the closures on Twitter:

“After a thorough review of our existing portfolio, we’ve decided to close a series of clubs and better align our locations with our strategy. Closing clubs is never easy and we’re committed to working with impacted members and associates through this transition.”

A Sam’s Club location in the Dayton region will add new technology that will help customers get through the checkout lanes even quicker. Sam’s Club, located at 1111 Miamisburg-Centerville Road, recently filed a permit to add new self-checkout registers in the store. A spokeswoman for Sam’s Club told this news organization that the club is slated to have six updated traditional checkouts and eight, new self-checkout registers.

FIVE FAST READS

• In another blow for Elder-Beerman, Bon-Ton posts holiday sales decline

• Allegiant to add new flights at local airport

• German grocery chain Lidl halts plans to open local store

• At Home store to open in Dayton area this month

• Currency of the future? Some argue it’s bitcoin

Here’s what to do if you are sexually harassed at work

Sexual harassment is not uncommon in the workplace. In a 2015 survey of 2,235 full-time and part-time female employees, Cosmopolitan found 1 in 3 women experienced sexual harassment at work at some point in their lives.

Here’s what you should know about sexual harassment in the workplace, according to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Department of Labor:

What is sexual harassment?

Generally, sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination in the workplace on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion.

Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees.

According to the Department of Labor, there are two forms of sexual harassment:

  • Quid pro quo: Involves an employment decision based on submission to the sexual harassment, such as promotion, assignment or keeping your job
  • Hostile work environment: Sexual harassment makes workplace hostile, intimidating, abusive or offensive

Are there state laws with more protections against sexual harassment in addition to Title VII?

Some states have adopted stronger protections. Harassment can include, but is not limited to:

  • Unwelcome sexual advances;
  • Requests for sexual favors;
  • Other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature;
  • Non-sexual but offensive remarks about a person’s sex.

Harassment is illegal when:

  • Conduct is unwelcome;
  • Conduct is “based on the victim’s protected status”;
  • Subjectively abusive to person affected;
  • “Severe and pervasive” enough to create a work environment that a “reasonable person” would find hostile.

What factors are used to determine of harassment is “severe and pervasive” enough?

  • Frequency of unwelcome conduct;
  • Severity of conduct;
  • Whether conduct was physically threatening/humiliating or “mere offensive utterance”;
  • Where conduct “unreasonably” interfered with work performance;
  • Effect on employee’s psychological well-being;
  • Whether harasser was a superior at the organization.

From the Department of Labor:

Each factor is considered, but none are required or dispositive. Hostile work environment cases are often difficult to recognize, because the particular facts of each situation determine whether offensive conduct has crossed the line from “ordinary tribulations of the workplace, such as the sporadic use of abusive language . . . and occasional teasing,” to unlawful harassment.

However, the intent of the Department of Labor's Harassing Conduct Policy is to provide a process for addressing incidents of unwelcome conduct long before they become severe and pervasive enough to create a hostile work environment under the law.

Does the gender of the victim or harasser matter?

No. Both the victim and harasser can be either a woman or a man — or both can be the same sex.

Does the title of the harasser matter?

No. The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in another department, a coworker, an employee of a separate employer, a client or a customer.

What about teasing?

According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments or isolated incidents that are “not very serious.”

However, teasing becomes illegal when:

  • The behavior becomes frequent or severe;
  • The behavior creates a hostile or offensive work environment;
  • The behavior results in an adverse employment decision (victim is fired or demoted).

What if you weren’t directly harassed but you feel affected?

You do not have to be the victim of direct harassment to be affected by the offensive conduct. It is still considered sexual harassment, according to the EEOC.

What should you do if you experience sexual harassment?

Inform the harasser at once that the behavior is unwelcome, then directly use “any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.” 

This may include reaching out to your direct manager or employer or talking to your company’s human resources department. Check your employee handbook for more information.

If you really can’t find someone you trust, labor and law employment attorney Nannina Angioni suggests you contact the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

Experts also recommend filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Find directions on the EEOC’s website.

You may also want to continue keeping a record of the discriminatory activity and seek support from friends and family.

What if speaking out is too difficult?

“Some victims will never report abuse, and they have that right,” psychologist Nekeshia Hammond told NBC News. “It’s a case by case thing, and sometimes there’s a reason for staying silent — if you feel your safety is threatened, or if you’re literally on the verge of having an emotional breakdown and will be unable to function. But you need to reach out to someone.”

Hammond recommends calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673), which includes free services and confidential support.

Can staying silent work against me, legally?

According to the Department of Labor, “the department cannot correct harassing conduct if a supervisor, manager or other Department official does not become aware of it.”

In fact, when an employee “unreasonably fails to report harassing conduct,” the department can use this as a defense against a suit for harassment.

Additionally, if you file a complaint with the EEOC, it’s recommended you do so within 180 days of the discriminatory activity.

» RELATED: Woman says she lost work hours after reporting sexual harassment

How does the EEOC investigate allegations of sexual harassment?

The department looks at the circumstances of the misconduct, the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the incidents allegedly occurred.

“A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis,” the EEOC website states.

How can companies stop sexual harassment from occurring?

According to the EEOC, prevention is the best tool. Employers should be vocal about the intolerance of sexual harassment and establish a complaint and grievance system.

Learn more about workplace sexual harassment at dol.gov and eeoc.gov.

Should companies hire more remote workers? CEOs, employees weigh in

Should companies hire more remote workers?

Wooed by the appeal of waking up later and working in pajamas, many company employees would answer with an emphatic “yes.” 

And some company leaders agree. 

“The happiest and most productive companies are staffed by teams who work remotely,” says Brian de Haaff, CEO of product roadmap software Aha!.

>> Read more trending news 

De Haaff, who leads a team of remote workers, believes remote work gives employers access to a larger talent pool, while giving remote workers more freedom, better health, a bigger sense of accomplishment and more room to be productive.

De Haaf, who says remote workers are outperforming office-bound employees, cites benefits for remote workers as follows:

  • No need to settle for a job within driving distance of one’s home
  • No need to rush home for family duties -- you’re already there
  • No commute means more time for sleep and exercise
  • Distance makes the heart grow fonder, not complacent, which means working remotely leads to more meaningful conversations with co-workers
  • Fewer office distractions means more time to be productive

“Remote work leads to happier and more productive teams. And when workers are happy and productive, they bring their best to each day -- which in turn leads to happier customers,” de Haaff wrote in a LinkedIn blog post. “In other words, everyone benefits.”

But Richard Laermer, CEO of RLM Public Relations, believes otherwise. 

“I think people have to be trusted,” Laermer told Bloomberg. “But the working-from-home thing has to be on a per-person basis, and it can’t be very often. It just doesn’t work.”

Laermer, who once let his workers do their jobs remotely often, used to believe that “you can get your work done anywhere, as long as you actually get it done.” But he had a change of heart after employees took advantage of the perk by being unavailable online and refusing to go into the office for meetings.

Other companies, including Yahoo, IBM and Best Buy, which once allowed more workers to do their jobs remotely, have rolled back at-home allowances, with some claiming remote workers are more likely to get distracted by non-work-related tasks.

According to The New York Times, people employed in the fields of community and social services; science, engineering and architecture; and education, training and library, are less likely to work remotely. And that may be fair, The Atlantic reported, as jobs in those fields -- and others -- often require in-person interactions with clients and customers or “collaborative efficiency,” necessary for solving problems as a group.

But many workers and studies show working remotely has benefits that can’t be denied.

Bloomberg points out that more telecommuters means more savings for companies because they don’t have to pay fees and monthly costs to rent out large office buildings.

“People do their best work when they are given the autonomy to work where they need to,” Michael Beach, a business adviser, wrote on a LinkedIn forum about remote work. “The ideal situation is allowing people to work at the office and at home and let them decide how best to deliver the results that you're counting on them to produce.”

“Depends on the professional and the scope of work activities,” Lori Ann Reese, a brand manager and content specialist, wrote on the same forum. “Culture of the business, nature of the job duties, and strengths of the worker are all factors that decide whether it ‘works’ or does not.”

Regardless of one’s view, remote work is growing. According to the Society of Human Resource Management, remote work has increased 20 percent in the last 20 years. And a Gallup report found that “flexible scheduling and work-from-home opportunities play a major role in an employee’s decision to take or leave a job.”

Dream job alert: Get paid $10,000 per month to 'experience' Cancun

Love to travel? Looking for a new job? 

A new job posting by Cancun.com might be just what you’re looking for. 

>> Read more trending news 

The travel site is seeking a social media savvy CEO, or a “Cancun Experience Officer.”

A description of the position online notes that the company is looking for “an outgoing, authentic and dynamic individual (or team) to represent the amazing destination of Cancun.”

The CEO will live in Cancun between March and August 2018, developing video of the vacation, capturing photos and creating written content. The CEO will be the face of the Cancun.com brand and its newly launched website.

Salary is listed at $10,000 per month -- and that doesn’t include the housing costs that will be completely paid for during the six-month period.

“You’ll get paid to dive into the culture, charm and wonder of Cancun and share your experiences with a worldwide audience,” the posting reads. 

“We can’t wait to get started on our search for a CEO to be the face and personality of Cancun. Getting paid to live and travel around Mexico is a once in a lifetime experience,” Chad Meyerson, general manager at Cancun.com, said in a press release. “It’s truly one of the most remarkable travel destinations, and we want to make sure we find the right person to help us show the rest of the world everything Cancun has to offer, from the culture and community to its beautiful hotels and pristine beaches.”

According to the press release, other perks include: 

  • Sleeping in luxurious beds overlooking the most pristine beaches
  • Scaling 3,000-year-old pyramids followed by a swim with a 40,000-pound whale shark
  • Sipping an ice-cold beverage before teeing off 200 yards down an ocean fairway
  • Mingling with locals and tourists at your VIP table in the hottest clubs
  • Coordinating charitable projects with local organizations to support education, health and well-being 
  • Having the most enviable job on the planet

Interested job seekers have until Dec. 17 to apply. A minute-long video describing why you’d be the perfect fit for the position is required.

The top five finalists will travel to Cancun in January, and the winner or winners will be announced Jan. 31. 

Apply here

U.S. Forest Service hiring for 1,000 seasonal jobs in Washington, Oregon

The U.S. Forest Service is accepting applications for seasonal spring and summer jobs in Oregon and Washington

>> Read more trending news

Positions are available in multiple fields, including fire management, recreation, natural resources, timber, engineering, visitor services and archaeology.

“Seasonal employment with the Forest Service is a great way to give back to communities, learn new skills, and perform meaningful work,” regional forester Jim Peña said in a news release this week. “If you are interested in working with a dedicated team of people who take pride in managing our national forests, we encourage you to consider joining the Forest Service.”

Applications must be submitted online between Nov. 14 and Nov. 20. 

Search more jobs across the country with the U.S. Forest Service here.

>> Related: Delta hiring 1,000 flight attendants

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