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Tsunami warning sent from Texas to New York was a test, NWS says

People along the East and Gulf coasts took to social media Tuesday morning after a test tsunami warning was apparently confused for the real thing, prompting at least one company to send alerts to residents from Texas to New York City.

>> Read more trending news

The National Weather Service’s National Tsunami Warning Center sent out a monthly tsunami warning test around 8:30 a.m., according to officials.

“We have been notified that some users received this test messages as an actual tsunami warning,” officials with the NWS regional office in Caribou, Maine, said on Twitter. “A tsunami warning is not in effect. Repeat, a tsunami warning is not in effect.”

WINTER STORM ADVISORY, WARNING in effect until 1 p.m. Wednesday

  • Snow arriving overnight; Most will pick up 1 to 3 inches 
  • UPDATE: Winter Storm Warning, 10 tonight through 1 p.m. Wednesday: Clinton, Warren
  • UPDATE: Winter Weather Advisory, 10 tonight through 1 p.m. Wednesday: Butler, Champaign, Clark, Greene, Montgomery, Darke, Preble, Miami, Union (Indiana), Wayne (Indiana)
  • Expect messy morning commute

Download the WHIO Weather App

DETAILED FORECAST

Tonight: Snow likely after midnight, continuing through the early morning. Snow may mix with freezing rain and sleet near I-71. Temperatures will hold in the 20s. 

>> Snow returns this morning, more on the way

Today: Snow will taper in the morning. Accumulations of 1 to 3 inches expected for Dayton and areas north and west. Amounts as much as 4 to 5 inches possible southeast of Dayton to near I-71. Some ice accumulation, up to two-tenths of an inch possible in the far southern Miami Valley. Skies will remain mostly cloudy into the afternoon with a chance of flurries or light snow showers redeveloping in the early evening. Highs will hold in the upper 20s.

>> School business closings & delays

Thursday: Ready for some sun? Expect partly sunny skies and chilly temperatures with highs in the upper 20s.

>> Winter Weather Awareness: How does salt help melt ice on roads?

Friday: Mostly cloudy skies. Some flurries will be possible in the far northern Miami Valley. Highs will rebound into the upper 30s.

Saturday: Expect mostly cloudy skies with a chance for rain and/or snow showers late in the evening. Highs will be near 40 degrees.

Sunday: Rain or snow showers will be likely in the morning, changing to snow showers in the afternoon as temperatures fall through the 30s. 

Blizzard of 1978: Today marks daily snowfall record anniversary

If you think we’ve had a rough winter so far, at least it’s not a repeat of 1978.

On Jan. 26, the storm dropped over a foot of snow; this date still holds the record for the most snow in Dayton in a 24-hour period, according to Dayton Daily News archives.

The 40th anniversary of the Blizzard of 1978 is this week. The blizzard lasted three days, from Jan. 25 until Jan. 27, 1978.

>> 3 times Dayton snowstorms were so big, you actually should have bought bread and milk

>> Meet the people who braved the Blizzard of 1978 to broadcast on the radio and run wreckers in the havoc

The National Guard was called in to help deliver supplies and rescue those stuck in the snow. Interstate 75 was closed for four days, air traffic was halted at the airport, and RTA and the postal servic both halted service.

>> Weather anniversary: The 2004 snowstorm that buried the Miami Valley 

Dayton officials estimated the blizzard caused over $4 million in damages, according to the archives.

Winter storm timeline: When the storm will hit where you live

Don't let the spring-like weather fool you Thursday. A winter storm is still going to impact the Miami Valley Friday. 

Here’s the latest projected timing of the storm:

FRIDAY: Rain showers will impact most of the area before 8 a.m.. A transition to a wintry mix of sleet and freezing rain will develop between 7 and 10 a.m. in communities like Celina, Wapakoneta, Sidney and Greenville. The cold air will transition the central Miami Valley to a wintry mix from 12 p.m. into the early afternoon in the Dayton area. Everyone then has the chance to see scattered snow for the evening drive. The chance for a light glaze of ice then snow will keep the roads slick Friday into Saturday morning. 

>> RELATED: Rainy and warm today; Winter Storm Watch issued Friday through Saturday morning

SATURDAY: Active snow will end very quickly overnight. Most of the impacts Saturday will come from refreeze and blowing/drifting snow. Saturday will be much colder so anything wet or untreated could stay snowy or icy. Gusts around 30MPH will be possible. Temperatures overnight will drop into the single digits!

>> RELATED: Friday storm brings threat for icing before transition to snow

The combination of a wintry mix and snow (likely two to four inches w/isolated higher amounts) will make this system impactful.

Could a coming storm system turn into a ‘weather bomb’?

UPDATE (Nov 15) 2:30 p.m.

The first of two major storm systems to impact the Miami Valley is crossing the area this evening bringing with it showers and breezy conditions. 

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We are still tracking a stronger system which will impact our area Friday into Saturday. There have been some changes in how the late week storm is set to evolve. Earlier model runs from a few days ago showed this storm system rapidly strengthening and pushing across the Miami Valley late on Friday. 

That timing would have increased the risk for severe storms in our area late Friday and produced a significant threat for high winds. While the threat for strong winds still appears to be on the table, the timing has changed based on the latest model runs.

RELATED: See more trending stories on WHIO.com

Now, the storm system is forecast to move into the Ohio Valley early Saturday morning which will lower the threat for any severe storms. It also appears the storm system will not quite “bomb out” as it moves across the Great Lakes, although it will still intensify rapidly as it moves into the region. It now appears the storm system will not meet the definition of a “bombogenesis” which would mean the storm system would need to strengthen 1 millibar per hour for 24 hours.

That being said, there will still be a strong low-level jet stream that sets up with and just behind the storm system. As the storm system moves into the region late Friday, gusty winds will pick up to near or over 25 mph. As the cold front crosses early Saturday morning, wind gusts of over 40mph will be possible.

As cold air ushers in on Saturday morning, wind gusts could jump to between 40 to 50mph briefly before diminishing some Saturday afternoon and evening.

It will remain blustery through the weekend with temperatures falling from the 50s into the 30s Saturday and holding in the 30s on Sunday.

There will also be the chance for some scattered flurries or snow showers late Saturday night into Sunday, especially north of I-70. 

FIRST REPORT

As the seasons begin to change, the clash of warm and cold air masses fuel big storms, and we’ve certainly been a witness to that this month.

November is certainly known in history to produce some doozies. Just this past weekend, we passed the anniversary of the Veteran’s Day tornado outbreak that killed 36 people, including four in Ohio, in 2002. It was also the 42-year anniversary of a severe Great Lakes storm in 1975 that sank the Edmund Fitzgerald, killing all 29 on board.

A little more than a week ago, another massive storm produced 17 tornadoes in Ohio alone, with more in Indiana. Now, if the forecast models are correct, another major storm looks to impact the Miami Valley by the end of this week.

» READ MORE: National Weather Service confirms 17 tornado touchdowns in Ohio

Since last weekend, our long-range models have been showing the potential for another intense storm system to develop across the Northern and Central Plains late this week. The storm system is then forecast to begin “bombogenesis” as it sweeps into the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes. Bombogenesis refers to a rapidly intensifying area of low pressure.

To be classified as a weather bomb, the central pressure of an intensifying storm system must drop at least 24 millibars within 24 hours. Such storm systems are known to produce very strong, and in some cases near hurricane-force, winds. These types of systems are quite common near New England in the winter when Nor-Easters produce massive amounts of snow and blizzard conditions up the East Coast.

» READ MORE: 15 damaging storms that pounded Ohio in recent history

Sometimes these power storm systems can form near or over the Great Lakes and are aided by the relatively warm waters of the lakes. Late this week, we may get to witness what one of these intense storm systems looks — and feels — like.

At this point, it is too early to know if severe winds will be felt across the Miami Valley, but the potential exists for wind gusts to exceed 50 mph by late Friday and perhaps into Saturday. With such wind speeds, some power outages could be possible and should be planned for. If you have any loose items still outside, you’ll want to secure those before you go to bed Thursday night.

» WEATHER: Get the latest Storm Center 7 forecast

The greatest impact from the high winds will likely be closer to the Great Lakes themselves, not to mention on the Great Lakes where waves could grow to over 10 to 15 feet (or perhaps higher). Also, if you have early Thanksgiving Day travel plans, some flights could be impacted by this storm beginning late Thursday and through the weekend.

One other important note, if you have already started decorating for the holidays, or are planning to start later this week or even into the weekend, you may either want to make sure everything is secure or just hold off until the weekend after Thanksgiving. Otherwise, your Santa Claus may just take flight after all, along with the rest of your decorations.

3 tornado touchdowns confirmed in Mercer County

UPDATE @ 1:57 p.m. (Nov. 6):

A third tornado touchdown has been confirmed near Wabash in Mercer County.  The third touchdown was an EF-2 tornado with maximum winds of 120 mph and a path length of 8 miles, according to the National Weather Service.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

UPDATE @ 12:15 p.m. (Nov. 6)

The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF-2 tornado in Celina Sunday, according to preliminary reports.

UPDATE @ 12 p.m. (Nov. 6)

The National Weather Service has confirmed an EF-2 tornado near St. Anthony in Mercer County caused devastating damage Sunday afternoon.

EF0...wind speeds 65 to 85 mph. 

EF1...wind speeds 86 to 110 mph. 

EF2...wind speeds 111 to 135 mph. 

EF3...wind speeds 136 to 165 mph. 

EF4...wind speeds 166 to 200 mph. 

EF5...wind speeds greater than 200 mph

More detailed information will be released later today.. 

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

Mercer County Sheriff Jeff Grey said Burville Road south of Ohio 29 remains closed, as well as parts of Mud Pike Road in Celina.

He said many farms and turkey barns were destroyed. Farmers in the area are bringing out their equipment to help their neighbors in need, Grey said.

Celina Mayor Jeff Hazel said Grand Lake and Havemann roads in Celina also remain shut.

Power is restored to about 90 percent of the city. A total of 40 businesses are without power.

EARLIER REPORT

A storm survey is scheduled for Monday morning and will reveal more details about the severe storms that made their way through Wabash and Celina.

The survey will focus on supercell thunderstorms that moved through the county, according to the weather service.

Late Sunday, Celina Mayor Jeffrey Hazel declared a State of Emergency for the city.

>> PHOTOS: Storms, tornado touchdown in Miami Valley

Of the two suspected tornadoes, the strongest hit the east end of Celina’s business district. The National Weather Service said preliminary reports indicate a EF-1 tornado caused the damage.

Final results from the survey are expected later Monday, with officials saying the study may move east into Western Auglaize County.

>> RELATED: ‘Significant’ damage, injuries, reported from Mercer County tornado

>> RELATED: Power outages remain after Sunday storms

>> RELATED: Mercer County farmers work to rescue nearly 400 cows from destroyed barn

>> RELATED: Celina schools closed Monday following storms, tornado

Hurricane Nate downgraded to tropical storm, continues path on land

UPDATE @ 5:10 p.m. (Oct. 8)

Tropical Storm Nate continues to move north through as tropical storm and surge warnings for Southeast Louisiana and South Mississippi were canceled Sunday morning.

Natenever reached the Category 2 level forecasters expected, according to the National Weather Service, and began weakening overnight.

Social media posts from those living in parts of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi showed flooding and storm surges, but nothing near the destruction originally expected.

While the storm lost strength quickly, the National Weather Service reports Nate earned the distinction of the fastest moving Hurricane the Gulf of Mexico has ever seen.

UPDATE @ 8:15 p.m. (Oct. 7)

Hurricane Nate made landfall at the mouth of the Mississippi River as a Category 1 storm with winds of 85 mph.

The National Hurricane Center said that Nate is expected to make a second landfall along the Mississippi coast later tonight. Evacuations have been ordered along the central Gulf Coast.

UPDATE @ 6:20 p.m. (Oct. 7)

Hurricane Nate is expected to strengthen into a Category 2 hurricane at landfall tonight along the northern Gulf coast, the National Hurricane Center reported.

The storm’s top sustained winds were 90 mph as of earlier today.

Some oil and gas platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are being shut down as the hurricane churns toward the U.S. mainland, the Associated Press reported. About one-fifth of U.S. oil is produced in the Gulf.

UPDATE @ 11:50 p.m. (Oct. 6)

The National Hurricane Center reported late Friday that Nate is now a hurricane with maximum winds estimated at 75 mph.

UPDATE @ 1:10 p.m. (Oct. 6) 

Tropical Storm Nate is pulling away from the Honduras coastline and moving closer to the Yucatan Peninsula, according to the Friday update from the National Hurricane Center.

>> Fall color increases across the Miami Valley

Nate will bring heavy rain, damaging winds, storm surge and life threatening flash flooding to the Yucatan Peninsula region later today.

>> WHIO Interactive Radar

The storm will move north into the Gulf of Mexico early Saturday, then is expected to intensify to a hurricane before making landfall near New Orleans late Saturday or Sunday. Direct impacts will also be damaging winds, heavy rain, and significant storm surge.

The Miami Valley is expected see the remnants of this storm late Sunday night into Monday as it tracks to the south. The greatest threats locally will be heavy rain and gusty winds. 

EARLIER REPORT

A tropical depression that developed off the coast of Costa Rica has strengthened to become Tropical Storm Nate, said Storm Center 7 Meteorologist Kirstie Zontini.

The National Hurricane Center is expecting Nate to directly impact Nicaragua and Honduras today. Rain could exceed 20 inches in Nicaragua with as much as a foot possible near Honduras and eventually the Yucatan Peninsula. 

Tropical storm force winds extend 60 miles out from the center of the storm. Strengthening is possible as the storm moves north through the Gulf. Heavy rain, strong winds and dangerous storm surge will be possible up to the northern Gulf Coast, but specific placement and impacts are yet to be determined.

>> WHIO Interactive Radar

A long range track does show the left over moisture/the remnants from Nate bringing an increased chance for rain to the start of next week here in the Miami Valley. This could change as well.

J.J. Watt’s Harvey fundraising pushes past $20 million

J.J. Watt’s rush to continue raising money for the victims of Hurricane Harvey and the historic flooding in and around Houston that followed the Aug. 25-30 storm broke the $20 million mark, as his online crowdfunding site pushed past that threshold about 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to USA Today.

>> George Strait, Beyonce, others to hold Hurricane Harvey relief concert

Watt pledged $100,000 to the Red Cross fund when he started it with the goal of raising $200,000.

>> Read more trending news

“It’s such a testament to the people out there," Watt said Sunday after donations of $1 million from Tennessee Titans owner Amy Adams Strunk, $1 million from Walmart, $200,000 from hip-hop artist Drake and $50,000 from NBA star Chris Paul.

Watt, an all-pro defensive end for the Houston Texans, said Sunday when the total raised was at $17 million. “It’s such a testament to how much good there is in the world.’’

>> Complete Harvey coverage from the Austin American-Statesman

Many NFL owners and players have pledged money to Harvey victims, including Falcons owner Arthur Blank, who has committed $1 million.

Sandra Bullock donates $1M to American Red Cross for Harvey relief

Actress Sandra Bullock has given $1 million to the American Red Cross’s Harvey Relief Fund, People magazine reports

>> Complete Harvey coverage on Statesman.com

The “The Proposal” and “Minions” star, who owns a home in Austin, Texas, told the magazine that her decision was made in an attempt to bring people together. 

>> Hurricane Harvey: Celebs pledge help to those affected by storms

“I’m just grateful I can do it,” she told People. “We all have to do our part...There are no politics in eight feet of water. There are human beings in eight feet of water.”

>> Harvey makes second landfall in Louisiana (live updates)

Bullock is just one of many celebrities who have donated their time or money for Tropical Storm Harvey relief. Among others, Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt has started a fundraiser that has raised more than $5 million since Sunday, and comedian Kevin Hart said he will donate $25,000 to the American Red Cross, and urged his celebrity friends to do the same. 

>> Read more trending news

Tropical Storm Harvey has dumped more than 50 inches of rain over Houston and its surrounding areas, the greatest amount of rainfall ever recorded in the 48 contiguous states from one storm. As of early Wednesday morning, 19 people were confirmed dead as a result of the storm. 

Winter blizzard 2017: How much snow will Boston get? The forecast has changed

The snow, freezing rain and sleet that began in the Mid-Atlantic region on Monday and moved toward New England early Tuesday has delivered on the promise of miserable conditions, slick roads and power outages, but a slight change in forecast is changing estimated snow accumulation for some.

According to Fox 25.com and the National Weather Service, the storm is tacking closer than expected to the Northeast coast, shifting the heaviest precipitation inland, west of the Interstate 95 corridor.

This shift will likely cut the expected amounts of snowfall accumulation in the Boston metro area. Western Massachusetts, however, can expect significant snow by Tuesday afternoon. Forecasters say that anything from 1-4 inches an hour is possible there.

However, revised snow accumulation estimates are not near the 24 inches forecast for Boston on Monday. The newest forecast calls for 8-12 inches of snow in the metro area.

According to the NWS, “Near the I-95 corridor from Boston to Washington D.C., sleet, freezing rain, even some rain is possible before changing back to snow and ending from south to north.”

The storm, coming days before the official start of spring, closed schools, business and led to hundreds of flights being canceled at Logan International Airport.

While the storm is setting up to intensify, forecasters are saying that warmer air is also being pulled into the system and will lead to a wintry mix along the coast and east of the I-95 corridor instead of a steady snowfall.

Overall in the region, more than 5,000 flights have been canceled and power is out to more than 100,000 customers from Virginia to Pennsylvania.

>>WATCH: FOX25 is live all day with the latest forecast

>> School closings

>> Hour-by-hour radar: What time does snow arrive in your town?

>> Emergency phone numbers and links

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