Last Song Played
DAYTON'S CLASSIC HITS
On Air
No Program
Last Song Played
DAYTON'S CLASSIC HITS

national

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Who is White House physician Ronny L. Jackson?

U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Ronny L. Jackson became physician to the president in 2013, when he was appointed by President Barack Obama. It’s a position that has been around since George Washington became president, but it did not become official until Congress created the title in 1928. 

>> Read more trending news

Jackson is the 18th person to hold the position, which is now part of the White House Military Office. His medical experience includes an overseas stint in Iraq, and he is qualified in submarine and hyperbaric medicine.

The 50-year-old was born and raised in Levelland, Texas, located in the western part of the state near the New Mexico border. He graduated from Texas A&M University at Galveston in 1991 with a bachelor of science degree in marine biology, according to his biography. He attended medical school at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, where he graduated in 1995 with a Doctor of Medicine degree.

>> Trump physical results: 6 things to know

Jackson then completed his internship at the Portsmouth Naval Medical Center in Virginia and began active duty naval service in 1995. He returned to Portsmouth in 2001 to begin his residency in emergency medicine. He completed his residency in 2004, finishing at the top of his class.

In 2005 he joined the 2nd Marines, Combat Logistics Regiment 25 at Camp LeJeune, North Carolina. He was then deployed to Iraq, where he served during Operation Iraqi Freedom as an emergency medicine physician based out of Taqaddum, Iraq.

While still serving in Iraq, Jackson was appointed a White House physician, serving on the staff of Air Force Brig. Gen. Richard Tubb. He was named the physician to the president in July 2013 and was retained when Donald Trump was elected president. That is an unusual step; typically, an incoming president selects a new physician to man the post.

>> White House physician releases official report 

In addition to Iraq, Jackson also has served in Norfolk, Virginia; Panama City, Florida; Pearl Harbor; and Sigonella, Italy.

Jackson has been awarded the Legion of Merit award and is a four-time winner of the Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal. He has earned three Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medals and also was awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal.

Jackson married Jane E. Annable in Galveston on Jan. 30, 1993. They now live in Silver Spring, Maryland, and have three children: Libby, Ben and Matthew.

White House physician releases official report with details of president’s exam

U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Ronny L. Jackson, the physician to the president, released the particulars of President Donald Trump’s physical exam in an official report Tuesday. It was Trump’s first periodical physical as president and was conducted last Friday at the Walter Reed Army National Military Medical Center.

>> Read more trending news

The results were released with the president’s consent, Jackson said in an official memorandum sent to White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders.

At 6-foot-3 and 239 pounds, the 71-year-old president had a blood pressure reading of 122/74 and a resting heart rate of 68 beats per minutes.

Trump’s vision is 20/30, with a corrected visual acuity of 20/20, according to the report. His thyroid was normal, and there were no issues with his teeth or gums. There were no issues with his gastrointestinal system or his urinary tract, the report said.

>> Trump physical results: 6 things to know 

The president’s past medical history includes hypercholesterolemia, a condition that is caused very high levels of cholesterol in the blood; and rosaccea, a common skin disease that is characterized by a person blushing or looking flushed more easily than other people.

Trump is currently taking several types of daily medication, Jackson wrote, including aspirin; Rosuvastatin to lower cholesterol; Finasteride to aid in the prevention of male pattern hair loss; Ivermectin to treat rosaccea when needed; and a multivitamin product.

Other than an appendectomy when he was 11, Trump has had no major surgery.

Jackson said the president’s overall health “was excellent,” helped in part because Trump does not drink or smoke.

“He continues to enjoy the significant long-term cardiac and overall health benefits that come from a lifetime of abstinence from tobacco and alcohol,” Jackson wrote.

Jackson did note that the president “would benefit” from a diet lower in fat and carbohydrates and also more exercise.

Jackson also said he was encouraging the president to exercise more.

Job posting for 'Chicken Nugget Connoisseur' is clucking good

If you love Chicken Nuggets, this job will have you clucking in anticipation every day.

>> Read more trending news

“Just like a good steak, this opportunity is rare,” the British-based B&M budget retailer posted to its website. The job opening is for a “Chicken Nugget Connoisseur,” and the candidate who gets the job will receive a 25-pound voucher every month to spend on “fresh and frozen food” in their local B&M store. The job requires the nugget eater to share feedback with B&M.

“You’ll want to take a bite out of this,” B&M wrote on its website.

So, what kind of job experience does one need for this job?

In its job posting, B&M offers some specific clues:

  • Getting the 20 share box of nuggets from McDonald's and keeping them all for yourself;

  • Being the first in the office kitchen whenever someone says “there’s cake”;

  • That time you tripped and fell at a buffet and saved the plate before yourself;

  • Going to an event or party because there is free food;

  • You value the importance of a fish finger sandwich in life;

  • You can conduct a Powerpoint presentation on the reasoning behind curly fries being nicer than chips;

If you believe you qualify, wing it and apply.

At least 4 Olympians won’t accept invitation to White House

Controversy has hit the Winter Olympics before the torch has been lit in South Korea, as four U.S. Olympians — plus one “furious” ice skater who didn’t end up making the cut — preempted a White House invite from President Donald Trump by turning it down.

>> Read more trending news

Skiers Gus Kenworthy and Lindsey Vonn, and figure skaters Nathan Chen and Adam Rippon have all said publicly that they will not accept a White House invite from the president in the event that they receive one.

Figure skater Ashley Wagner said the same, but she didn’t make Team USA.

Kenworthy and Rippon, who are both openly gay, said that they do not support Trump’s policies and do not want to appear that they do by visiting the White House.

“I am very proud to represent the U.S. but I don’t stand by Trump and his cabinet and their policies,” Kenworthy said. ”I do not want to feign approval for policies that are in place and things that are being pushed at the moment, by going. If I was invited I would decline my spot.”

Rippon said that he felt it is his “duty” not to go.

“Athletes are given a really special platform. It’s our duty, as athletes, to be role models. I won’t go to the White House,” Rippon told the BBC. “I won’t go because I don’t think somebody like me would be welcome there. I know what it’s like to go into a room and feel like you’re not wanted there.”

USA Today reported that Nathan Chen and Ashley Wagner would also decline an invite. In Wagner’s case, it is moot since she did not qualify for Team USA.

Wagner notably missed out on an Olympic appearance, said that she was “furious” about the decision-making by the judges and that she believed that she wasn’t treated fairly.

“I’m furious. I am absolutely furious. I know when I go and I lay it down, and I absolutely left one jump on the table. But for me to put out two programs that I did at this competition, as solid as I skated, and to get those scores, I am furious, and I think deservedly so,” she said. “I am absolutely OK with [judges] being strict on my [jump] rotations […] but you know it needs to be across the board. I don’t necessarily feel like it’s been that way at this event, so we’ll see how things pan out.”

The U.S. Figure Skating selection committee responded that the judges “absolutely made the right call.”

Wagner later changed her tune.

Lindsey Vonn said as early as the beginning of December that she hoped to “represent the people of the United States, not the president.”

When asked if she would accept an invite she replied “Absolutely not.”

Trump physical results: 6 things to know

President Donald Trump is in excellent health and likely to finish his term in office without any medical issues, a presidential doctor said Tuesday at a news conference, four days after the president underwent a physical exam.

>> Read more trending news

“The president's overall health is excellent," White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson said Tuesday.

Here are six things to know about the results of the president’s physical:

Jackson: ‘He had great findings across the board’

Trump is in “very, very good health,” Jackson said Tuesday. 

“(I have) no concerns for his heart health,” the presidential physician said. “There are many good things that came from his exam, I think he had great findings across the board. “

>> White House physician releases official report

Jackson said Trump’s good health is likely to last through “the remainder of this tern, and even for the remainder of another term, if he’s elected.” He said he based his assessment on the president’s cardiac results.

“He falls into a category that portends years of event-free living,” Jackson said. “He has incredibly good genes, and that’s just the way God made him.”

Cognitive screening showed no issues

Jackson said he conducted a cognitive screening on Trump at the president’s request, although he felt the test was unnecessary.

“I’ve spent almost every day in the president’s presence,” said Jackson, whose office is near Trump’s. “I’ve got to know him pretty well and I had absolutely no concerns about his cognitive ability or neurological functions.”

He said that in all his conversations with Trump, the president has been “very articulate.”

“I’ve never known him to repeat himself around me,” Jackson said. “He says what he wants to say and speaks his mind.”

Infamous slurred speech incident might have been caused by medication

A December incident in which the president sounded as though he was slurring his speech while announcing a policy shift in Israel was probably due to a medication, Jackson said.

>> Related: Trump’s slurred speech: Is it loose-fitting dentures, dry mouth or something else?

“We evaluated him, we checked everything out and everything was normal,” Jackson said, adding that the incident was likely caused because the president needed water.

He said prior to the Dec. 7 incident, he gave Trump Sudafed, which might have “inadvertently dried up his secretions.”

Trump working to lose 10-15 pounds

At 6-foot-3 and 239 pounds, the president has a body mass index of 29.9, just under the number that would designate him as obese, according to information released Tuesday.

“The president, he and I talked and... I think a reasonable goal over the next year or so is (to lose) 10 or 15 pounds,” Jackson said, adding that a nutritionist would be meeting with White House chefs in the coming weeks and that Trump would be put on an exercise routine.

“He’s more enthusiastic about the diet,” Jackson said.

Jackson not concerned about Trump’s stress levels

Despite concerns from the public and reports that have painted a chaotic White House, Jackson said that he has no concerns about the president’s stress levels.

“I talk to him sometimes about stress just because I think it’s my job as his physician to bring it up on occasion,” he said. “I’ve never seen the president stressed out too much. ... He has a unique ability to push the reset button and he just gets up and he starts a new day. (I think it’s) made him healthier from a stress standpoint.”

Jackson did not test Trump’s hearing

Jackson said he didn’t have enough time to test Trump’s hearing, although he planned to conduct such a test in future physicals.

Jacksonville RB Leonard Fournette involved in multicar crash

The Florida Highway Patrol confirmed that Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette was involved in a three-car crash Tuesday on I-295 in Jacksonville. 

>> Read more trending news

Sgt. Dylan Bryan said Fournette was inside a vehicle involved in the collision. Fournette was able to drive home, a Jaguars spokesman said. 

There were no injuries and Fournette was not at fault, officials said. 

A driver of a black Buick in the crash was cited for careless driving. 

The crash occurred around 11:40 a.m. on I-295 southbound near Heckscher Drive and the Dames Point Bridge, according to FHP. 

The crash temporarily blocked a lane. 

Fournette and the Jaguars will be playing for a spot in the Super Bowl on Sunday when they travel to New England to face the Patriots in the AFC championship game.

Police: Man angry over video game shoots, kills mom

A California man is accused of shooting and killing his mother after becoming upset over a video game he was playing, police officials said. 

Matthew Douglas Nicholson, 28, of Ceres, is charged with murder and making a criminal threat, according to records from the Stanislaus County Jail. He is being held without bail. 

Officials with the Ceres Police Department reported that officers were called to Nicholson’s parents’ home shortly before 10 p.m. Thursday after his father called 911 to report the shooting. Nicholson’s mother, Lydia Susanne Nicholson, had been shot in the head.

The 68-year-old woman died of her injuries at a hospital. 

>> Read more trending news

Detectives determined that Matthew Nicholson was in his bedroom, playing video games, when he became enraged over the game he was playing and started yelling, police officials said. His mother went into his room to check on him, and the pair began arguing. 

Nicholson broke his game headset during the argument and blamed his mother, officials said. Threatening to kill his mother and father, he retrieved a handgun, police officials said.

After firing two shots into a wall, Nicholson turned the gun on his mother, according to investigators. 

He also tried to shoot his father, Loren Nicholson, who wrestled the gun away from him, a Ceres Police Department news release said. The 81-year-old was not injured in the scuffle. 

“I understand that he would’ve killed the father, too, but the gun jammed,” a family friend told Fox 40 in Sacramento. “The father grabbed the gun (and) emptied it.”

Matthew Nicholson fled and headed to his sister’s home, in nearby Riverbank, police officials said. Officers there located the vehicle he was driving and conducted a high-risk traffic stop.

Nicholson was taken into custody without incident, the news release said.   

His sister described their mother as a wonderful person who loved her children and husband of 32 years. Lydia Nicholson worked in the local school system, Autumn Nicholson told Fox 40

“(She) had so much compassion for people and just wanted to see the best in people at all times,” she said. 

Man accused of taking manhole covers, replacing them with traffic cones

A Massachusetts man has been accused of taking manhole covers from roads across the town.

Police in Webster said he was kind enough, however, to cover the empty holes -- which measure from 4 to 12 feet deep -- with traffic cones so no one would run over them in their cars, The Worcester, Massachusetts, Telegram reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Darrin Lavallee now faces larceny charges, the paper reported.

Police were called by several eyewitnesses, who said they saw a man in a PT Cruiser taking the manhole covers. Eventually police found a car that matched the vehicle’s description and found orange cones inside. Police told The Telegram that the covers had been in the car recently.

Lavallee apparently told police that the manhole covers ended up at a local salvage yard, where police said he sold them, The Telegram reported. Police were able to recover the pilfered covers.

  

Women targeted in Jacksonville Walmart purse snatchings

Women in a Florida city are being targeted at Walmart parking lots as they unload groceries, police said.

>> Read more trending news

Two women said Monday that a car pulled up beside them and the driver tried to snatch their purses at a Walmart parking lot near the Avenues Mall in Jacksonville. 

“I grabbed my purse, put it on my shoulder and grabbed her purse and was holding it in my hand,” Denise Wilson said. 

Wilson said she did it to make sure no one was able to swipe their purses as she and her friend, Cathy Elliott, were loading grocery bags. But, she said, someone still managed to try.

“A car came over, almost hit me, grabbed my purse, I screamed and clutched back and pulled back,” Wilson said. 

The car was about 4 inches from her when she said the driver reached out of the window and grabbed at her purse.

“In that moment I was mad, just obviously (as) you are concerned. You could be hurt, but I was just mad that someone was grabbing at me,” Wilson said. 

She said the car was a red, four-door sedan and the driver was a man with long, curly, reddish-brown hair and in his 20s.

Wilson was able to fight back before anything was stolen. 

“She screamed, then I screamed and they took off so it was really so fast (that) you couldn’t begin to plan it out if you wanted to,” Elliott said. 

The women called police and the responding officer told them they had received a call 20 minutes after their call that a woman's purse was stolen from a Walmart in a different part of the city.

“They feel that they started here and just took off (I-)295 and went over there and got that purse,” Elliott said. 

The women said that they believe it was a crime of opportunity.

“We are usually pretty vigilant with knowing what’s going on around us. We missed that one. We won’t miss it again,” Elliott said. 

Walmart officials said the stores have security inside and it’s the retailer's mission to keep everyone safe.

CDC cancels nuclear disaster talk, focus switches to flu outbreak

Three days after a false report of a missile attack on Hawaii seemed the perfect time to help the public for a nuclear disaster. But instead, the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the top of Tuesday’s discussion to the flu epidemic

The CDC did not immediately respond to questions surrounding the topic change for the public health discussion, which had been planned for several weeks. 

RELATED: CDC prepares for nuclear attack

The CDC says the previous event, titled “Public Health Response to a Nuclear Detonation,” will be held at a future date. The session will focus on local, state and federal preparations in the event of a nuclear attack. 

>> Read more trending news 

“While a nuclear detonation is unlikely, it would have devastating results and there would be limited time to take critical protection steps,” the CDC said before the event was changed. “Despite the fear surrounding such an event, planning and preparation can lessen deaths and illness. For instance, most people don’t realize that sheltering in place for at least 24 hours is crucial to saving lives and reducing exposure to radiation.”

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >