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Experts: Parents feed babies solid food too soon

Are Americans feeding their babies solid foods too early?

One group of child-feeding advocates say yes and that the move to feed babies solids early can follow them for the rest of their lives.

>> Read more trending news 

The group, called thousanddays.org, examined nutrition for babies in America.

Thousand days refers to pregnancy through the first two years after birth.

Its research found that nearly 40 percent of parents are introducing solids too early and that only 22 percent of babies are exclusively breastfed for six months.

Thousanddays.org said that more than half of moms say they are getting mixed messages on what to feed their babies.

So what are parents feeding their children and when?

Chloe Barrera with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevents said that she oversaw a study that took a look at what 1,482 babies from the age of 6 to 36 months ate. Parents told researchers when they first ate food that wasn’t formula or breast milk. Other foods included juice, cow’s milk, baby food or other solids. About two-thirds of families were not following official recommendations. Some parents introduced foods too early, or before 4 months (16.3 percent) , many (38.3 percent) gave food to their babies between 4 and 5 months, while some held off solid foods until 7 or more months (12.9 percent), Huffington Post reported.

Barrera’s study was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

But study authors say the numbers may be worse than reported since research depended upon self-reporting and that parents who know the recommendations may have under-reported the ages of their children and when they fed them solid foods, Huffington Post reported.

Experts say babies should be either breast fed or fed for their first 6 months because those foods have the nutrients babies need for development. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services are both working on federal guidelines for children under 2 years old. The guidelines are expected to be released in 2020, Huffington Post reported.

Related video:

Oklahoma family seeking medical marijuana for child hopes for legalization

As Oklahoma voters prepare to make a decision on legalizing medical marijuana, one family is using cannabis oil to help a young girl with a rare medical condition.

>> Watch the news report here

>> On FOX23.com: Oklahoma Gov. Fallin sets election date for medical marijuana measure

KOKI has been following the story of Jaqie Angel Warrior for years now. Her mother, Brittany Warrior, said she needs cannabis oil to help with the seizures she has every day.

>> On FOX23.com: New poll finds 62 percent of Oklahomans support medical marijuana measure

Jaqie Angel Warrior suffers from a rare and potentially deadly form of epilepsy. Traditional pharmaceuticals haven't worked well for her, the family says.

She started having seizures at 5 months old. At 20 months old, the family put her on cannabis oil at the advisement of her neurologist. Since then, she has been weaned off all pharmaceuticals.

Jaqie's mother, Brittany Warrior, said they were losing all hope before they tried cannabis oil.

>> Read more trending news 

"Prior to starting cannabis, Jaqie had anywhere from 150 to 300 seizures a day. She was catatonic and life was fading out of her before my eyes," she said.

The family has traveled back and forth, and even temporarily moved to states with legalized medical marijuana.

Now that State Question 788 is on the ballot in Oklahoma, Brittany Warrior hopes that voters will support the measure to help her child.

Must-see: Passenger jet skids off runway, gets stuck on edge of cliff

A passenger jet carrying 162 people got stuck on a cliff's edge moments after skidding off a runway early Sunday at Turkey's Trabzon Airport.

According to The Associated Press, no one was hurt in the incident, and everyone on board was evacuated safely. The airport was closed temporarily.

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities said they did not know what caused the incident involving the Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800, which was traveling from Ankara to Trabzon, the AP reported.

Dramatic photos from the scene quickly circulated on social media. Take a look at some of them below:

WATCH: Formerly homeless boy cries tears of joy when he sees his own bed

A formerly homeless boy was moved to tears when he was surprised with his very own bed to sleep in.

>> Click here to watch the heartwarming video

Eight-year-old Daeyrs of Detroit has been living in shelters with his mom, Dionna, for most of his life. They have been homeless since she lost her job as a nurse.

>> On HotTopics.TV: Boy cries when he learns about homelessness, gets involved to help 

According to “Inside Edition,” the family was finally granted state housing but couldn’t afford to furnish the home. Daeyrs had been sleeping on only blankets until the family got the help they needed.

Nonprofit organization Humble Design stepped in to make the house a home for the family.

“When we visited them earlier this week they just had an air mattress on the ground and a few camp chairs,” the organization wrote on Facebook.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

Video shared to the group’s Facebook page shows Daeyrs touring the house with his mom for the first time. When it came time to tour his room, the designers told Daeyrs to close his eyes.

When he opened them, he saw a completely furnished room, complete with "Star Wars" posters, a desk, and most importantly, his very own bed.

>> Read more trending news 

He immediately broke down in tears.

“Seeing how much having a bed and his own room meant to Daeyrs, it really made me realize what’s important in life and grateful for everything I have,” Humble Design founder Tregar Strasberg told “Inside Edition.”

FDA warns against cough medicine for kids with codeine, hydrocodone

Do you reach for the cough syrup when your little one catches a cold? Make sure it doesn’t include codeine or hydrocodone, because the Food and Drug Administration says the opioid ingredients could pose some serious safety risks

» RELATED: Opioids now kill more Americans than guns or breast cancer, CDC says

The organization announced Thursday that it is now requiring manufacturers to change the labels on cough and cold medicines containing these ingredients to prevent children under 18 from using them. 

>> Read more trending news 

The FDA is also asking companies to add new safety warning labels on medicines for adults, including an expanded boxed warning, which describes the risks of taking those that include codeine and hydrocodone. 

Common side effects of opioid use include headache, vomiting, dizziness, breathing difficulties and even death. 

»RELATED: 5 ways to to talk to your young child about the opioid epidemic

“Given the epidemic of opioid addiction, we’re concerned about unnecessary exposure to opioids, especially in young children. We know that any exposure to opioid drugs can lead to future addiction. It’s become clear that the use of prescription, opioid-containing medicines to treat cough and cold in children comes with serious risks that don’t justify their use in this vulnerable population,” FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.

In September, the FDA met with the Pediatric Advisory Committee to determine the dangers associated with using opioids in children’s cough medicine. They believe the risks outweigh the benefits. And while they say some kids’ cough require treatment, symptoms usually subside on their own. 

“It’s critical that we protect children from unnecessary exposure to prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone,” Gottlieb said. “At the same time we’re taking steps to help reassure parents that treating the common cough and cold is possible without using opioid-containing products.”

» RELATED: FDA panel: Teens risk breathing trouble from codeine cough syrup

Related video:

School cancels classes after more than 160 students call out with flu

A Christian school in North Carolina was closed Thursday and Friday after officials said more than 160 students called out sick Tuesday.

>> Read more trending news

A school administrator at Carmel Christian School in Matthews said the cancellation was the first in school history prompted by a flu-like outbreak. 

"That's horrible,” said Tammy Corsino, who lives nearby. “That’s a large amount of children.”

Administrators hope the long weekend will allow sick students extra time to recover and prevent healthy students from being exposed to the flu. Students are already off Monday for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, so they won’t return to school until Tuesday.

“Safeness is the way to go when it comes down to kids,” said Albert Corsino, who lives nearby. “Wouldn't want that to spread more."

School officials are going to great lengths to disinfect the campus. They hired contractors to use a disinfecting misting machine that is often used in hospitals on Thursday to sanitize every hallway, bathroom and classroom, in addition to wiping down every surface.

“That is a good school, a good decision,” Tammy Corsino said.

Experts have said this flu season is the worst in years, with nearly double the amount of cases nationwide compared to last year.

Already, 20 people in North Carolina have died from the flu.

“Since we got the flu shot, I feel pretty safe,” Tammy Corsino said.

The state will release its updated flu report Thursday.

Police can request your DNA from sites like Ancestry, 23andMe

Millions of people have handed their DNA over to genetic testing companies like Ancestry or 23andMe to learn more about their family history

Eric Yarham wanted to learn about his heritage, so he mailed off his saliva to 23andMe.

“I’m just trying to unravel the mystery that is your genetics,” said Yarham.

Yarham was surprised to find a tiny portion of his DNA profile can be traced back to sub-Saharan Africa. He was also unaware that his genetic information could end up in the hands of police. 

>> Read more trending news 

“The police make mistakes and I would rather not be on the unfortunate end of one of those mistakes, as a result of my DNA being somewhere that is unlucky,” Yarham said.

Both 23andMe and Ancestry confirm your DNA profile could be disclosed to law enforcement if they have a warrant.

23andMe Privacy Officer Kate Black said, “We try to make information available on the website in various forms, so through Frequently Asked Questions, through information in our privacy center.”

According to the company’s self-reported data, law enforcement has requested information for five American 23andMe customers since it began offering home test kits more than a decade ago. 

23andMe’s website states, “In each of these cases, 23andMe successfully resisted the request and protected our customers’ data from release to law enforcement.”

Black said she wouldn’t entirely rule it out in the future. “We would always review a request and take it on a case-by-case basis,” Black said.

Ancestry.com self-reports that it complied with a 2014 search warrant to identify a customer based on a DNA sample. Ancestry claims to have more than four million customers.

Boston 25 checked with District Attorneys’ in Suffolk, Middlesex, Essex, and Norfolk Counties.

None were aware of any Massachusetts cases where results from a private genealogy testing service has been requested or used in a criminal investigation.

Jacksonville Dr. Saman Soleymani, who has studied genetics extensively and been an expert witness in criminal cases said genetic information submitted by a family member can also be of interest to law enforcement for familial matching. 

“They can see what the likelihood is of these certain alleles, of these genetic markers, matching up to make it -- likelihood of whether you were involved in, let’s say, that criminal activity or not,” said Dr. Soleymani. Soleymani said he didn't take any chances when he sent his DNA to 23andMe. “I literally sent my kit saying my name is Billy Bob,” he added.

If you or a family member has sent in your genetic material to Ancestry or 23andMe, both companies allow you to delete your DNA results.

'I don’t believe it myself': Ohio breast cancer survivor, former teacher turns 104

To celebrate being 104 years old, like Ruth Ann Slade did Tuesday afternoon, one must have good genes and what her friend called “inner strength.”

>> Watch an interview with Slade here

Slade, who spent 37 years as a first- and second-grade teacher in Poasttown, Ohio, has beaten breast cancer twice and persevered after her leg was pinned under a patio door for 18 hours as her body temperatures fell to dangerous levels.

“I see a survivor,” said Chuck Veidt, 60, who cares for Slade in his West Alexandria Road residence. “She is something else. A true survivor. Her mind is better than mine. She’s a tough act to follow.”

When asked about her 104th birthday, Slade said: “I don’t believe it myself.”

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

About 10 years ago, Veidt checked on Slade in her home up the street from his to see if she needed anything from the grocery store. He was shocked to see her lying face down in the kitchen as about a foot of snow accumulated just outside the door. She was rushed to Middletown Regional Hospital, where her body temperature returned to safe levels after two hours. She suffered frost bite.

She later told Veidt she listened to the furnace turn off and on so she wouldn’t fall asleep.

Diagnosed with breast cancer in 1979, she had her left breast removed. Thirty-one years later, the cancer returned in her right breast.

Longevity is part of Slade’s DNA. Her father and mother lived to be 91 and 89, respectively, though she has buried her two younger brothers and sister.

She credits eating fresh food from the family garden for her long life, but Veidt chimed in that Slade often told him not being married was the reason.

Born in a farmhouse in Madison Twp. in 1914, Slade graduated from Middletown High School in 1932. Her last MHS class reunion was her 60th in 1992. She’d probably be the only one still alive for her 86th class reunion.

“A class of one,” Veidt said with a smile.

>> Read more trending news 

Slade taught two years in a one-room school house, then 35 years after Poasttown built a new school. One of her former first-grade students, Homer Hartman, 86, attended Slade’s birthday party. Before Hartman was wheeled into the house, Slade gave a warning: “He’s going to tell a bunch of lies about me.”

Hartman didn’t disappoint. While he called Slade his “favorite” teacher, he said she frequently put him in the corner of the classroom.

“She didn’t let me get away with much,” he said.

She responded: “I never put him in the corner. None of my students.”

Slade retired in 1972 and said there is no way she could teach today because of the lack of discipline shown by some students.

“Kids would tell me where to go,” she said with a smile.

Is Slade afraid to die? She just shook her head.

“A new experience for me,” she said.

She paused, then added: “When (God) comes for me, I will be ready to go.”

4-year-old boy dies in Ohio's first pediatric flu-related death of the season

A 4-year-old Ohio boy has died from the flu in Montgomery County.

The child, Jonah S. Rieben, of Clayton, was identified by the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office Wednesday morning. The official cause and manner of his death have not been determined by the coroner’s office.

Rieben died on Jan. 6 after being admitted to Dayton Children’s Hospital. It is the first pediatric flu-related death in Ohio this year. Last flu season there were seven pediatric deaths in Ohio.

>> Read more trending news 

The Ohio Department of Health announced Wednesday afternoon a 1-year-old boy from Lucas County also died from the flu, becoming the second pediatric flu-related death in the state. 

Jonah Rieben, who was born in Bulgaria, was adopted by the Rieben family in February 2017. He had 16 brothers and sisters. “A brave warrior who fought and overcame many difficult battles throughout his short life, Jonah inspired us all with his strength and resiliency,” an obituary stated. 

“It is a tragedy anytime a loved one is lost and we extend our condolences to the family and friends who are affected,” said Dr. Michael Dohn, medical director, Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County.

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Is the ‘man flu’ real? Scientists claim men experience worse flu symptoms

Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months or older get a flu shot as soon as possible. It’s still not too late to get vaccinated as the flu season extends until the end of spring. 

“No parent should ever have to suffer the loss of a child to the flu. Our hearts go out the family,” said Jon Woltmann with the infectious disease department at Dayton Children’s Hospital. “We encourage parents to get their children vaccinated to not only protect them, but children who are not able to get the vaccine due to underlying health conditions.”

Husband, wife win $1 million prizes in separate contests just months apart

Imagine finding gold at the end of a rainbow — twice. That’s how lucky a Massachusetts couple has found themselves over the last few months.

Robert Goodwin won a $1 million jackpot after scratching off a $5 instant lottery ticketthe Massachusetts State Lottery announced Monday. Anyone would be astonished at his good fortune, but for Goodwin and his wife, this wasn’t their first rodeo.

Back in August, Jane Goodwin won a $1 million prize in the Publisher’s Clearing House sweepstakes.

>> See the clip here

Robert Goodwin is taking his winnings home in a lump sum, which will leave him with $650,000 in his pocket — definitely nothing to scoff at.

The couple is planning on combining their earnings to buy a home in a retirement community. Their reason?

“No more shoveling,” said Robert Goodwin.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

Just last week, a New Jersey woman found out she’d be taking home a staggering $5 million after finally checking the numbers on a scratch-off lottery ticket she accidentally purchased two weeks ago.

Oksana Zaharov, 46, meant to buy a $1 scratch-off ticket while she was shopping in New York City, but she was mistakenly issued a $10 one by the clerk instead. Even though she went ahead a bought it anyway, she waited a full two weeks to check it.

“When the clerk handed me the wrong ticket I felt bad, so I decided to just go ahead and buy it,” she said on Tuesday, according to a Fox News report. “I actually used the ticket as a bookmark for a couple weeks before I decided to scratch it.”

>> Read more trending news 

She plans on setting her winnings aside for her children’s college plans, but before then, a family vacation to the Bahamas is on the horizon.

“I never win anything,” Zaharov said. “I was sure the ticket was fake. It wasn’t until I brought it into the office that I knew it was for real.”

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