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Bill Murray takes catnap at SXSW premiere of 'Isle of Dogs'

Bill Murray took a catnap at the premiere of the film "Isle of Dogs."

Murray voices the canine Boss in Wes Anderson's movie, which was shown Saturday at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas.

The 67-year-old Murray read the poem "Dogs" accompanied by a cellist and joined Anderson and cast members onstage to answer questions from the audience.

But Murray nodded off when the questions centered on the filmmaking process.

Pitbull to speak at United Nations about global water crisis

Grammy Award-winning rapper Pitbull is heading to the United Nations to discuss the global water crisis on World Water Day.

The organization Clean Water Here announced on Monday that the international pop star will be named Clean Water Here Ambassador on March 22, when he visits the U.N. in New York City.

Pitbull also will receive the 2018 World Water Champion Award for his global humanitarian efforts. He is leading the celebrity-driven social media campaign dubbed "Clean Water Here Cause Flash," in hopes of raising awareness of the water crisis. Other participants include Bruno Mars, Pink, Maroon 5, Demi Lovato, Monica and Juanes.

On March 22, U.N. General Assembly President Miroslav Lajcak will launch a 10-year plan focused on sustainable development of water resources.

Dior men's designer Kris Van Assche departs after 11 years

Christian Dior announced Monday that long-time menswear designer Kris Van Assche would leave the Parisian fashion house and be succeeded by former Louis Vuitton designer Kim Jones.

Van Assche, a 41-year-old Belgian, whose minimalist, urban aesthetic has garnered praise during his 11-year tenure at Dior, is one of Paris fashion's most recognizable faces. Van Assche said he was leaving with his "mind and heart filled with experiences" to "pursue new challenges."

After he shuttered his smaller eponymous label in 2015 amid challenging market conditions, Dior was his main occupation.

Dior parent company LVMH Group said that Van Assche would remain in the group and his future role would be announced later.

In a separate statement, Dior announced that Jones, a British designer, will replace him in the high-profile role that's one of the fashion industry's most coveted.

Jones, 44, was formerly menswear designer at Louis Vuitton, also of LVMH, and held his celebrity-filled swan song in January alongside models Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell.

Jim Carrey criticized for portrait believed to be Sanders

Jim Carrey is being criticized on social media for a portrait he painted that is believed to be White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

The actor and comedian on Saturday tweeted the painting with the caption: "This is the portrait of a so-called Christian whose only purpose in life is to lie for the wicked. Monstrous!"

Some Twitter users accused Carrey of shaming because of the unflattering portrait. Others were critical of his use of Christian.

A spokeswoman for Carrey confirms it is his painting. But she would not confirm it is Sanders.

The White House has not returned a message seeking comment.

Blue Ivy Carter, Tyler Perry get into $20K bidding war over painting at art auction

Blue Ivy Carter may only be 6 years old, but she's already an art connoisseur.

According to USA Today, the daughter of Beyoncé and Jay-Z got into a high-priced bidding war with media mogul Tyler Perry on Saturday at the Wearable Art Gala in Los Angeles. 

>> Read more trending news 

Blue Ivy reportedly bid $17,000 on a piece, described by E! as "an acrylic painting of a young Sidney Poitier," before Perry fired back with an $18,000 offer. Not one to be outdone, Blue Ivy bid $19,000 "as Jay-Z jokingly tried to take her arm down," according to USA Today. Perry ended up paying $20,000 for the painting.

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Beyoncé's mother, Tina Knowles, and her husband, Richard Lawson, organized the gala.

Read more here or here.

Jack White Plays First Show in Nearly Two Years

Jack White is gearing up to tour in support of his upcoming 'Boarding House Reach' LP — and worked out any last-minute kinks in the set list with a couple of small-scale performances.

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Pete Townshend Saved Roger Daltrey's New Solo Album

Roger Daltrey has revealed that he doubted his new solo album was worth recording, until he was talked into it by his Who bandmate Pete Townshend,

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Judas Priest's 'Firepower' Is Their Highest Charting Album Ever

Judas Priest’s new album 'Firepower' has made its Billboard 200 debut at No. 5, making it the highest-charting release in the veteran metal band’s history.

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After 2017 election, US poised to fight fake news - in Kenya

Just ahead of Kenya's disputed 2017 election, video clips started spreading on social media of a slick-looking CNN broadcast asserting that President Uhuru Kenyatta had pulled far ahead in the polls. But the CNN broadcast was fake, splicing together real coverage from CNN Philippines with other footage with the network's iconic red logo superimposed in the corner.

It happened with a BBC video, too, and with a photo purportedly of Kenyan security forces killing protesters that was actually from Tanzania, and with thousands of spurious blog posts and other false reports that flooded the popular messaging app WhatsApp, fueling further divisions and turmoil in an election that morphed into a major political crisis.

So the U.S. government is gearing up to fight fake news — not at home, where it's the subject of heated debate following the 2016 presidential campaign, but in Kenya, where America has sought to nurture a vibrant but volatile African democracy.

"Information is, of course, power, and frankly, fake news is a real danger," U.S. Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec said in an interview, adding that it had eroded confidence in Kenya's real news media. "It's being weaponized. It's undermining democracy in Kenya."

Godec kicked off the awareness campaign this past week with an email to the 47,000 members of the State Department's Young African Leaders Initiative asking them to pledge to prevent the spread of fake media by pausing to verify the source and validity before passing information along to others through social media. For a while this week, the hashtag #StopReflectVerify was the No. 2 trending hashtag on Twitter in Kenya, where the U.S. Embassy pushed it to its 256,000 followers.

In addition to offering resources for discriminating between fact and fake, the campaign involves three-day training sessions for public affairs officials in Kenya's counties, encouraging local governments to be more responsive and forthcoming so that journalists on deadline can fact-check information they hear. Though it's starting in Kenya, the program is expected to expand, with an Africa-wide international fact-checking day and a global, virtual event on World Press Freedom Day in May anchored out of Nairobi.

The focus on fighting fake news in Kenya stands in contrast to what's happening in the United States, where President Donald Trump uses the term to denigrate credible news outlets that publish critical coverage about him or his Republican administration. Trump has also continually downplayed the role that false information from illegitimate sources may have played in affecting the outcome of the election. Last month, special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians accused of using a network of fake social media accounts and targeted political messages to stir up turmoil in the 2016 race.

The campaign also comes as the U.S. has been warning Kenya's government about worrisome restrictions on the legitimate news media. The group Human Rights Watch has said Kenyan officials try to stop critical coverage by threatening, intimidating and harassing journalists. The United States was particularly concerned in February when Kenya shut down major broadcasters after opposition leader Raila Odinga held a mock inauguration on television.

In Kenya, the fake news problem has also raised fears about violence being stoked by false facts that often mushroom on social media before they can be stopped.

At election time, a fake but realistic-looking U.S. diplomatic cable circulated that appeared to show embassy officials predicting instability, celebratory violence, "severe unrest and a massive breakdown of law and order" if Odinga were to defeat Kenyatta in the election. The U.S. embassy quickly tweeted its own version of the cable with the word "FAKE" slapped across it in bold red font.

Yet there are risks for the U.S. in appearing to tell people what to believe, say or not say in Kenya, a former British colony. So the embassy is taking pains to show it is a locally driven operation, partnering with groups like AfricaCheck, a fact-checking website similar to the U.S. site

"We're not asking them to believe any particular thing," Godec said. "We're just saying, don't take everything you see on your phone via WhatsApp as the truth because it may not be."


Reach Josh Lederman at http:/

Boston Marathon giving runners access to elite racers' music

The Boston Marathon is giving runners who use music as motivation free access to elite competitors' playlists and tips.

John Hancock, which sponsors the marathon, says it's teamed up with Spotify to let participants in next month's race listen to champion runners' favorite music.

Elite athletes contributing tracks to the project include four-time Olympian Shalane Flanagan, who holds the American women's record on the Boston course; 2014 winner Meb Keflezighi; and Tatyana McFadden, a Paralympics gold medalist and four-time Boston Marathon champion.

Along with the music, athletes have recorded advice designed to help runners make it to the finish line.

Runners can compile a custom playlist of music that most closely matches their pace and running style.

The 122nd Boston Marathon is April 16.


This story has been corrected to show the spelling is Meb Keflezighi, not Keflizighi.

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